Cloud 66: Harnessing Kubernetes expertise to simplify DevOps

About Cloud 66

Cloud 66 offers intuitive, feature-rich integrated management tools to facilitate application development, including Skycap, a container delivery pipeline.

Industries: Technology
Location: United States, United Kingdom

Using Google Kubernetes Engine, Cloud 66 autoscales to meet peaks in demand across time zones, saving 70% in computing costs while serving almost 4,000 customer workloads.

Google Cloud Results

  • Operates at a global scale to meet daily peaks in demand across time zones
  • Enables powerful proof point for using own container pipeline and operations products to integrate with Google Kubernetes Engine
  • Increases efficiency and reduces costs 70% with autoscaling and managed services

Computing costs down 70% with Google Kubernetes

By providing Ops tools for developers to build and deploy applications easily, Cloud 66 has grown to become a leading provider in containers, Rails, and Node. With either a hosted or on-premises model, Cloud 66 tools are ideally suited for hybrid and multicloud environments. In containers, its key products are Skycap, a Git-to-Kubernetes container delivery pipeline, and Maestro, an application lifecycle management service. Founded in 2011, the company now has offices in the United States and the United Kingdom, and its products are used by 12,000 developers in 100 different countries around the world, deploying over 4,000 workloads.

Cloud 66’s tools help both small and large enterprises to work with Kubernetes. “What we try to do is to create a solution where developers can focus on the code, but also bring it into production in a way that Ops governance supports,” says Udi Nachmany, VP of Business Development at Cloud 66. “Cloud 66 wants to give developers the power of self-service operations, but also still give operations the opportunity to see what’s going on. Our mission is to simplify DevOps.”

“We’re a small company so we don’t have our own data center and we needed a way to run our own operations on Kubernetes, both for efficiency and for product proof. Google Cloud Platform offered an opportunity to make efficiency gains, both in terms of cost and time.”

Khash Sajadi, Co-Founder and CEO, Cloud 66

As an innovator in the field, Cloud 66 wrote its own orchestrator in 2014, but given its focus on developer tooling, decided to switch to Kubernetes for its own stack in 2016. After 18 months of running on a cloud-based Kubernetes cluster, it looked for a managed Kubernetes solution that would meet its and its customers’ strict requirements for performance. Google Cloud Platform was the perfect fit.

“We’re a small company, and we don’t have our own data center. We needed a way to run our own operations on Kubernetes,” says Khash Sajadi, Co-founder and CEO of Cloud 66. “Google Cloud Platform offered an opportunity to make efficiency gains, both in terms of cost and time. It also enabled us to do what we call ‘extreme-dogfooding’ of our own tools on a highly performant Kubernetes service.”

The obvious choice for Kubernetes

In order to stay ahead of the latest innovations, hosted software providers have to keep their own systems up to date. After moving its own stack to Kubernetes, Cloud 66 looked for data storage, logging, and monitoring solutions that would work with Kubernetes. “Previously, we ran on containers in VMs, which brings a lot of latency and overhead, and used a collection of disparate solutions around the cluster,” says Khash.

As well as integrating with Kubernetes, Cloud 66 looked for services that were global, reliable, and low maintenance: “We needed managed services with global availability and support we could rely on,” says Khash. “We were looking for a database with low maintenance and the integration of tools for logging and reporting.”

“Once we made the decision to move to a managed container stack that can meet our customers’ strict demands for performance, then Google Kubernetes Engine was an obvious choice.”

Khash Sajadi, Co-Founder and CEO, Cloud 66

To answer these requirements, Cloud 66 switched to Google Cloud Platform. With customers in the United States and around the globe, Cloud 66 experiences multiple peaks in demand throughout the day. The autoscaling function in Google Cloud Platform means Cloud 66 now easily scales its capacity relative to these peaks. Working with Google Kubernetes Engine means its data systems integrate seamlessly with its Kubernetes clusters as part of a more consolidated system.

“With our customers’ production workloads in mind, since we don’t have a data center, once we made the decision we should move to a container stack then Google Kubernetes Engine was an obvious choice,” says Khash.

Feeding back improvements

Thanks to switching to Google Kubernetes Engine to manage its Kubernetes clusters, Cloud 66 now has an even greater understanding of its customers’ needs, allowing it to improve its products. “It’s really useful being integrated with Google Cloud and Google Kubernetes Engine, as we are deploying our own systems using our own products—the same container delivery pipeline and operations tools that our customers use,” says Udi. “If we find there is something we can improve or add, then other companies probably also need this functionality—and we can bring it into our platform.”

“The benefit is that our tools work around and on top of Kubernetes,” says Udi. “It’s a feedback loop: we use our own pipeline for the delivery of code into Kubernetes, and our own operations tools to manage the apps on top, which is a circular way to prove the stability and robustness of our own toolset.”

“If you’re a company using Kubernetes, with the powerful tooling we’ve developed, as an operations manager you will be able to offer self-service experience to your developers, to make the most out of Google Kubernetes Engine. We see that as something that has the potential to grow our customer base.”

Udi Nachmany, VP Sales and Business Development, Cloud 66

Developing new services

By moving its system to a containerized stack using Google Kubernetes Engine, Cloud 66 has seen its computing bills reduced by 70%. In addition, the company is more agile in the way it runs its services, as Khash explains: “Our responses to changes are much quicker. With Google Kubernetes Engine and Google App Engine, you get zero downtime, so pushing new code into production is really easy.” Now Cloud 66 hopes to develop new products that will allow more companies to work with Google Kubernetes Engine.

As part of the move to Google Cloud Platform, Cloud 66 built open source projects such as Habitus and Copper, as well as features such as Formations and Stencils into Skycap, its container delivery pipeline. “Once we moved to Google Kubernetes Engine, infrastructure wasn’t the problem anymore,” Udi said. “It was things like pipeline security and configuration that we had to innovate on for our own stack as well as for our customers. We consider this to be a case of real-world innovation, thanks to using Google Kubernetes Engine.” As part of this process, Cloud 66 also decided to join the CNCF as a sponsor.

“If you’re a company using Kubernetes, with the powerful tooling we’ve developed, as an operations manager you will be able to offer self-service experience to developers, to make the most out of Google Kubernetes Engine,” says Udi. “We see that as something that has the potential to grow our customer base.”

About Cloud 66

Cloud 66 offers intuitive, feature-rich integrated management tools to facilitate application development, including Skycap, a container delivery pipeline.

Industries: Technology
Location: United States, United Kingdom
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Try Kubernetes Engine, BigQuery, and other Cloud Platform products with $300 in free credit and 12 months.

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