Get started with managed collection

This document describes how to set up Google Cloud Managed Service for Prometheus with managed collection. The setup is a minimal example of working ingestion, using a Prometheus deployment that monitors an example application and stores collected metrics in Monarch.

This document shows you how to do the following:

  • Set up your environment and command-line tools.
  • Set up managed collection for your cluster.
  • Configure a resource for target scraping and metric ingestion.
  • Migrate existing prometheus-operator custom resources.

We recommend that you use managed collection; it reduces the complexity of deploying, scaling, sharding, configuring, and maintaining the collectors. Managed collection is supported for GKE and all other Kubernetes environments.

Managed collection runs Prometheus-based collectors as a Daemonset and ensures scalability by only scraping targets on colocated nodes. You configure the collectors with lightweight custom resources to scrape exporters using pull collection, then the collectors push the scraped data to the central data store Monarch. Google Cloud never directly accesses your cluster to pull or scrape metric data; your collectors push data to Google Cloud. For more information about managed and self-deployed data collection, see Data collection with Managed Service for Prometheus and Ingestion and querying with managed and self-deployed collection.

Before you begin

This section describes the configuration needed for the tasks described in this document.

Set up projects and tools

To use Google Cloud Managed Service for Prometheus, you need the following resources:

  • A Google Cloud project with the Cloud Monitoring API enabled.

    • If you don't have a Google Cloud project, then do the following:

      1. In the Google Cloud console, go to New Project:

        Create a New Project

      2. In the Project Name field, enter a name for your project and then click Create.

      3. Go to Billing:

        Go to Billing

      4. Select the project you just created if it isn't already selected at the top of the page.

      5. You are prompted to choose an existing payments profile or to create a new one.

      The Monitoring API is enabled by default for new projects.

    • If you already have a Google Cloud project, then ensure that the Monitoring API is enabled:

      1. Go to APIs & services:

        Go to APIs & services

      2. Select your project.

      3. Click Enable APIs and Services.

      4. Search for "Monitoring".

      5. In the search results, click through to "Cloud Monitoring API".

      6. If "API enabled" is not displayed, then click the Enable button.

  • A Kubernetes cluster. If you do not have a Kubernetes cluster, then follow the instructions in the Quickstart for GKE.

You also need the following command-line tools:

  • gcloud
  • kubectl

The gcloud and kubectl tools are part of the Google Cloud CLI. For information about installing them, see Managing Google Cloud CLI components. To see the gcloud CLI components you have installed, run the following command:

gcloud components list

Configure your environment

To avoid repeatedly entering your project ID or cluster name, perform the following configuration:

  • Configure the command-line tools as follows:

    • Configure the gcloud CLI to refer to the ID of your Google Cloud project:

      gcloud config set project PROJECT_ID
      
    • Configure the kubectl CLI to use your cluster:

      kubectl config set-cluster CLUSTER_NAME
      

    For more information about these tools, see the following:

Set up a namespace

Create the NAMESPACE_NAME Kubernetes namespace for resources you create as part of the example application:

kubectl create ns NAMESPACE_NAME

Set up managed collection

You can use managed collection on both GKE and non-GKE Kubernetes clusters.

After managed collection is enabled, the in-cluster components will be running but no metrics are generated yet. PodMonitoring or ClusterPodMonitoring resources are needed by these components to correctly scrape the metrics endpoints. You must either deploy these resources with valid metrics endpoints or enable one of the managed metrics packages, for example, Kube state metrics, built into GKE. For troubleshooting information, see Ingestion-side problems.

Enabling managed collection installs the following components in your cluster:

For reference documentation about the Managed Service for Prometheus operator, see the manifests page.

Enable managed collection: GKE

Managed collection is enabled by default for the following:

If you are running in a GKE environment that does not enable managed collection by default, then see Enable managed collection manually.

Managed collection on GKE is automatically upgraded when new in-cluster component versions are released.

Managed collection on GKE uses permissions granted to the default Compute Engine service account. If you have a policy that modifies the standard permissions on the default node service account, you might need to add the Monitoring Metric Writer role to continue.

Enable managed collection manually

If you are running in a GKE environment that does not enable managed collection by default, then you can enable managed collection by using the following:

  • The GKE Clusters dashboard in Cloud Monitoring.
  • The Kubernetes Engine page in the Google Cloud console.
  • The Google Cloud CLI. To use the gcloud CLI, you must be running GKE version 1.21.4-gke.300 or newer.
  • Terraform for Google Kubernetes Engine. To use Terraform to enable Managed Service for Prometheus, you must be running GKE version 1.21.4-gke.300 or newer.

GKE Clusters dashboard

You can do the following by using the GKE Clusters dashboard in Cloud Monitoring.

  • Determine whether Managed Service for Prometheus is enabled on your clusters and whether you are using managed or self-deployed collection.
  • Enable managed collection on clusters in your project.
  • View other information about your clusters.

To view the GKE Clusters dashboard, do the following:

  1. In the Google Cloud console, select Monitoring, and then select  Dashboards, or click the following button:

    Go to Dashboards

  2. Select the G​C​P dashboard category, and then select GKE Clusters.

The GKE Clusters dashboard in Cloud Monitoring.

To enable managed collection on one or more GKE clusters by using the GKE Clusters dashboard, do the following:

  1. Select the checkbox for each GKE cluster on which you want to enable managed collection.

  2. Select Enable Selected.

Kubernetes Engine UI

You can do the following by using the Google Cloud console:

  • Enable managed collection on an existing GKE cluster.
  • Create a new GKE cluster with managed collection enabled.

To update an existing cluster, do the following:

  1. In the Google Cloud console, select Kubernetes Engine, and then select Clusters, or click the following button:

    Go to Kubernetes clusters

  2. Click on the name of the cluster.

  3. In the Features list, locate the Managed Service for Prometheus option. If it is listed as disabled, click Edit, and then select Enable Managed Service for Prometheus.

  4. Click Save changes.

To create a cluster with managed collection enabled, do the following:

  1. In the Google Cloud console, select Kubernetes Engine, and then select Clusters, or click the following button:

    Go to Kubernetes clusters

  2. Click Create.

  3. Click Configure for the Standard option.

  4. In the navigation panel, click Features.

  5. In the Operations section, select Enable Managed Service for Prometheus.

  6. Click Save.

gcloud CLI

You can do the following by using the gcloud CLI:

  • Enable managed collection on an existing GKE cluster.
  • Create a new GKE cluster with managed collection enabled.

These commands might take up to 5 minutes to complete.

First, set your project:

gcloud config set project PROJECT_ID

To update an existing cluster, run one of the following update commands based on whether your cluster is zonal or regional:

  • gcloud container clusters update CLUSTER_NAME --enable-managed-prometheus --zone ZONE
    
  • gcloud container clusters update CLUSTER_NAME --enable-managed-prometheus --region REGION
    

To create a cluster with managed collection enabled, run the following command:

gcloud container clusters create CLUSTER_NAME --zone ZONE --enable-managed-prometheus

GKE Autopilot

Managed collection is on by default in GKE Autopilot clusters running GKE version 1.25 or greater. You can't turn off managed collection.

If your cluster fails to enable managed collection automatically when upgrading to 1.25, you can manually enable it by running the update command in the gcloud CLI section.

Terraform

For instructions on configuring managed collection using Terraform, see the Terraform registry for google_container_cluster.

For general information about using Google Cloud with Terraform, see Terraform with Google Cloud.

Disable managed collection

If you want to disable managed collection on your clusters, then you can use one of the following methods:

Kubernetes Engine UI

You can do the following by using the Google Cloud console:

  • Disable managed collection on an existing GKE cluster.
  • Override the automatic enabling of managed collection when creating a new GKE Standard cluster running GKE version 1.27 or greater.

To update an existing cluster, do the following:

  1. In the Google Cloud console, select Kubernetes Engine, and then select Clusters, or click the following button:

    Go to Kubernetes clusters

  2. Click on the name of the cluster.

  3. In the Features section, locate the Managed Service for Prometheus option. Click  Edit, and clear Enable Managed Service for Prometheus.

  4. Click Save changes.

To override the automatic enabling of managed collection when creating a new GKE Standard cluster (version 1.27 or greater), do the following:

  1. In the Google Cloud console, select Kubernetes Engine, and then select Clusters, or click the following button:

    Go to Kubernetes clusters

  2. Click Create.

  3. Click Configure for the Standard option.

  4. In the navigation panel, click Features.

  5. In the Operations section, clear Enable Managed Service for Prometheus.

  6. Click Save.

gcloud CLI

You can do the following by using the gcloud CLI:

  • Disable managed collection on an existing GKE cluster.
  • Override the automatic enabling of managed collection when creating a new GKE Standard cluster running GKE version 1.27 or greater.

These commands might take up to 5 minutes to complete.

First, set your project:

gcloud config set project PROJECT_ID

To disable managed collection on an existing cluster, run one of the following update commands based on whether your cluster is zonal or regional:

  • gcloud container clusters update CLUSTER_NAME --disable-managed-prometheus --zone ZONE
    
  • gcloud container clusters update CLUSTER_NAME --disable-managed-prometheus --region REGION
    

To override the automatic enabling of managed collection when creating a new GKE Standard cluster (version 1.27 or greater), run the following command:

gcloud container clusters create CLUSTER_NAME --zone ZONE --disable-managed-prometheus

GKE Autopilot

You can't turn off managed collection in GKE Autopilot clusters running GKE version 1.25 or greater.

Terraform

To disable managed collection, set the enabled attribute in the managed_prometheus configuration block to false. For more information about this configuration block, see the Terraform registry for google_container_cluster.

For general information about using Google Cloud with Terraform, see Terraform with Google Cloud.

Enable managed collection: non-GKE Kubernetes

If you are running in a non-GKE environment, then you can enable managed collection using the following:

  • The kubectl CLI.
  • The bundled solution included in Anthos deployments running version 1.12 or newer.

kubectl CLI

To install managed collectors when you are using a non-GKE Kubernetes cluster, run the following commands to install the setup and operator manifests:

kubectl apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/GoogleCloudPlatform/prometheus-engine/v0.7.0/manifests/setup.yaml

kubectl apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/GoogleCloudPlatform/prometheus-engine/v0.7.0/manifests/operator.yaml

Anthos

For information about configuring managed collection for Anthos clusters, see the documentation for your distribution:

Deploy the example application

The example application emits the example_requests_total counter metric and the example_random_numbers histogram metric (among others) on its metrics port. The manifest for the application defines three replicas.

To deploy the example application, run the following command:

kubectl -n NAMESPACE_NAME apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/GoogleCloudPlatform/prometheus-engine/v0.7.0/examples/example-app.yaml

Configure a PodMonitoring resource

To ingest the metric data emitted by the example application, Managed Service for Prometheus uses target scraping. Target scraping and metrics ingestion are configured using Kubernetes custom resources. The managed service uses PodMonitoring custom resources (CRs).

A PodMonitoring CR scrapes targets only in the namespace the CR is deployed in. To scrape targets in multiple namespaces, deploy the same PodMonitoring CR in each namespace. You can verify the PodMonitoring resource is installed in the intended namespace by running kubectl get podmonitoring -A.

For reference documentation about all the Managed Service for Prometheus CRs, see the prometheus-engine/doc/api reference.

The following manifest defines a PodMonitoring resource, prom-example, in the NAMESPACE_NAME namespace. The resource uses a Kubernetes label selector to find all pods in the namespace that have the label app.kubernetes.io/name with the value prom-example. The matching pods are scraped on a port named metrics, every 30 seconds, on the /metrics HTTP path.

apiVersion: monitoring.googleapis.com/v1
kind: PodMonitoring
metadata:
  name: prom-example
spec:
  selector:
    matchLabels:
      app.kubernetes.io/name: prom-example
  endpoints:
  - port: metrics
    interval: 30s

To apply this resource, run the following command:

kubectl -n NAMESPACE_NAME apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/GoogleCloudPlatform/prometheus-engine/v0.7.0/examples/pod-monitoring.yaml

Your managed collector is now scraping the matching pods. You can view the status of your scrape target by enabling the target status feature.

To configure horizontal collection that applies to a range of pods across all namespaces, use the ClusterPodMonitoring resource. The ClusterPodMonitoring resource provides the same interface as the PodMonitoring resource but does not limit discovered pods to a given namespace.

If you are running on GKE, then you can do the following:

If you are running outside of GKE, then you need to create a service account and authorize it to write your metric data, as described in the following section.

Provide credentials explicitly

When running on GKE, the collecting Prometheus server automatically retrieves credentials from the environment based on the node's service account. In non-GKE Kubernetes clusters, credentials must be explicitly provided through the OperatorConfig resource in the gmp-public namespace.

  1. Set the context to your target project:

    gcloud config set project PROJECT_ID
    
  2. Create a service account:

    gcloud iam service-accounts create gmp-test-sa
    

  3. Grant the required permissions to the service account:

    gcloud projects add-iam-policy-binding PROJECT_ID\
      --member=serviceAccount:gmp-test-sa@PROJECT_ID.iam.gserviceaccount.com \
      --role=roles/monitoring.metricWriter
    

  4. Create and download a key for the service account:

    gcloud iam service-accounts keys create gmp-test-sa-key.json \
      --iam-account=gmp-test-sa@PROJECT_ID.iam.gserviceaccount.com
    
  5. Add the key file as a secret to your non-GKE cluster:

    kubectl -n gmp-public create secret generic gmp-test-sa \
      --from-file=key.json=gmp-test-sa-key.json
    

  6. Open the OperatorConfig resource for editing:

    kubectl -n gmp-public edit operatorconfig config
    

  7. Add the text shown in bold to the resource:

    apiVersion: monitoring.googleapis.com/v1
    kind: OperatorConfig
    metadata:
      namespace: gmp-public
      name: config
    collection:
      credentials:
        name: gmp-test-sa
        key: key.json
    
    Make sure you also add these credentials to the rules section so that managed rule evaluation works.

  8. Save the file and close the editor. After the change is applied, the pods are re-created and start authenticating to the metric backend with the given service account.

Additional topics for managed collection

This section describes how to do the following:

  • Enable the target status feature for easier debugging.
  • Configure target scraping using Terraform.
  • Filter the data you export to the managed service.
  • Scrape Kubelet and cAdvisor metrics.
  • Convert your existing prom-operator resources for use with the managed service.
  • Run managed collection outside of GKE.

Enabling the target status feature

You can check the status of your targets in your PodMonitoring or ClusterPodMonitoring resources by setting the features.targetStatus.enabled value within the OperatorConfig resource to true, as shown in the following:

    apiVersion: monitoring.googleapis.com/v1
    kind: OperatorConfig
    metadata:
      namespace: gmp-public
      name: config
    features:
      targetStatus:
        enabled: true

After a few seconds, the Status.Endpoint Statuses field appears on every valid PodMonitoring or ClusterPodMonitoring resource, when configured.

If you have a PodMonitoring resource with the name prom-example in the NAMESPACE_NAME namespace, then you can check the status by running the following command:

kubectl -n NAMESPACE_NAME describe podmonitorings/prom-example

The output looks like the following:

API Version:  monitoring.googleapis.com/v1
Kind:         PodMonitoring
...
Status:
  Conditions:
    ...
    Status:                True
    Type:                  ConfigurationCreateSuccess
  Endpoint Statuses:
    Active Targets:       3
    Collectors Fraction:  1
    Last Update Time:     2023-08-02T12:24:26Z
    Name:                 PodMonitoring/custom/prom-example/metrics
    Sample Groups:
      Count:  3
      Sample Targets:
        Health:  up
        Labels:
          Cluster:                     CLUSTER_NAME
          Container:                   prom-example
          Instance:                    prom-example-589ddf7f7f-hcnpt:metrics
          Job:                         prom-example
          Location:                    REGION
          Namespace:                   NAMESPACE_NAME
          Pod:                         prom-example-589ddf7f7f-hcnpt
          project_id:                  PROJECT_ID
        Last Scrape Duration Seconds:  0.020206416
        Health:                        up
        Labels:
          ...
        Last Scrape Duration Seconds:  0.054189485
        Health:                        up
        Labels:
          ...
        Last Scrape Duration Seconds:  0.006224887

The output includes the following status fields:

  • Status.Conditions.Status is true when Managed Service for Prometheus acknowledges and processes the PodMonitoring or ClusterPodMonitoring.
  • Status.Endpoint Statuses.Active Targets shows the number of scrape targets that Managed Service for Prometheus counts on all collectors for this PodMonitoring resource. In the example application, the prom-example deployment has three replicas with a single metric target, so the value is 3. If there are unhealthy targets, the Status.Endpoint Statuses.Unhealthy Targets field appears.
  • Status.Endpoint Statuses.Collectors Fraction shows a value of 1 (meaning 100%) if all of the managed collectors are reachable by Managed Service for Prometheus.
  • Status.Endpoint Statuses.Last Update Time shows the last updated time. When the last update time is significantly longer than your desired scrape interval time, the difference might indicate issues with your target or cluster.
  • Status.Endpoint Statuses.Sample Groups field shows sample targets grouped by common target labels injected by the collector. This value is useful for debugging situations where your targets are not discovered. If all targets are healthy and being collected, then the expected value for the Health field is up and the value for the Last Scrape Duration Seconds field is the usual duration for a typical target.

For more information about these fields, see the Managed Service for Prometheus API document.

Any of the following might indicate a problem wth your configuration:

  • There is no Status.Endpoint Statuses field in your PodMonitoring resource.
  • The value of the Last Scrape Duration Seconds field is too old.
  • You see too few targets.
  • The value of the Health field indicates that the target is down.

For more information about debugging target discovery issues, see Ingestion-side problems in the troubleshooting documentation.

Configuring target scraping using Terraform

You can automate the creation and management of PodMonitoring and ClusterPodMonitoring resources by using the kubernetes_manifest Terraform resource type or the kubectl_manifest Terraform resource type, either of which lets you specify arbitrary custom resources.

For general information about using Google Cloud with Terraform, see Terraform with Google Cloud.

Filter exported metrics

If you collect a lot of data, you might want to prevent some time series from being sent to Managed Service for Prometheus to keep down costs. You can do this by using Prometheus relabeling rules with a keep action for an allowlist or a drop action for a denylist. For managed collection, this rule goes in the metricRelabeling section of your PodMonitoring or ClusterPodMonitoring resource.

For example, the following metric relabeling rule will filter out any metric that begins with foo_bar_, foo_baz_, or foo_qux_:

  metricRelabeling:
  - action: drop
    regex: foo_(bar|baz|qux)_.+
    sourceLabels: [__name__]

The Cloud Monitoring Metrics Management page provides information that can help you control the amount you spend on chargeable metrics without affecting observability. The Metrics Management page reports the following information:

  • Ingestion volumes for both byte- and sample-based billing, across metric domains and for individual metrics.
  • Data about labels and cardinality of metrics.
  • Use of metrics in alerting policies and custom dashboards.
  • Rate of metric-write errors.
For more information about the Metrics Management page, see View metric usage and diagnostics.

For additional suggestions on how to lower your costs, see Cost controls and attribution.

Scraping Kubelet and cAdvisor metrics

The Kubelet exposes metrics about itself as well as cAdvisor metrics about containers running on its node. You can configure managed collection to scrape Kubelet and cAdvisor metrics by editing the OperatorConfig resource. For instructions, see the exporter documentation for Kubelet and cAdvisor.

Convert existing prometheus-operator resources

You can usually convert your existing prometheus-operator resources to Managed Service for Prometheus managed collection PodMonitoring and ClusterPodMonitoring resources.

For example, the ServiceMonitor resource defines monitoring for a set of services. The PodMonitoring resource serves a subset of the fields served by the ServiceMonitor resource. You can convert a ServiceMonitor CR to a PodMonitoring CR by mapping the fields as described in the following table:

monitoring.coreos.com/v1
ServiceMonitor
Compatibility
 
monitoring.googleapis.com/v1
PodMonitoring
.ServiceMonitorSpec.Selector Identical .PodMonitoringSpec.Selector
.ServiceMonitorSpec.Endpoints[] .TargetPort maps to .Port
.Path: compatible
.Interval: compatible
.Timeout: compatible
.PodMonitoringSpec.Endpoints[]
.ServiceMonitorSpec.TargetLabels PodMonitor must specify:
.FromPod[].From pod label
.FromPod[].To target label
.PodMonitoringSpec.TargetLabels

The following is a sample ServiceMonitor CR; the content in bold type is replaced in the conversion, and the content in italic type maps directly:

apiVersion: monitoring.coreos.com/v1
kind: ServiceMonitor
metadata:
  name: example-app
spec:
  selector:
    matchLabels:
      app: example-app
  endpoints:
  - targetPort: web
    path: /stats
    interval: 30s
  targetLabels:
  - foo

The following is the analogous PodMonitoring CR, assuming that your service and its pods are labeled with app=example-app. If this assumption does not apply, then you need to use the label selectors of the underlying Service resource.

The content in bold type has been replaced in the conversion:

apiVersion: monitoring.googleapis.com/v1
kind: PodMonitoring
metadata:
  name: example-app
spec:
  selector:
    matchLabels:
      app: example-app
  endpoints:
  - port: web
    path: /stats
    interval: 30s
  targetLabels:
    fromPod:
    - from: foo # pod label from example-app Service pods.
      to: foo

You can always continue to use your existing prometheus-operator resources and deployment configs by using self-deployed collectors instead of managed collectors. You can query metrics sent from both collector types, so you might want to use self-deployed collectors for your existing Prometheus deployments while using managed collectors for new Prometheus deployments.

Reserved labels

Managed Service for Prometheus automatically adds the following labels to all metrics collected:

  • project_id: The identifier of the Google Cloud project associated with your metric.
  • location: The physical location (Google Cloud region) where the data is stored. This value is typically the region of your GKE cluster. If data is collected from an AWS or on-premises deployment, then the value might be the closest Google Cloud region.
  • cluster: The name of the Kubernetes cluster associated with your metric.
  • namespace: The name of the Kubernetes namespace associated with your metric.
  • job: The job label of the Prometheus target, if known; might be empty for rule-evaluation results.
  • instance: The instance label of the Prometheus target, if known; might be empty for rule-evaluation results.

While not recommended when running on Google Kubernetes Engine, you can override the project_id, location, and cluster labels by adding them as args to the Deployment resource within operator.yaml. If you use any reserved labels as metric labels, Managed Service for Prometheus automatically relabels them by adding the prefix exported_. This behavior matches how upstream Prometheus handles conflicts with reserved labels.

Teardown

To disable managed collection deployed using gcloud or the GKE UI, you can do either of the following:

  • Run the following command:

    gcloud container clusters update CLUSTER_NAME --disable-managed-prometheus
    
  • Use the GKE UI:

    1. Select Kubernetes Engine in the Google Cloud console, then select Clusters.

    2. Locate the cluster for which you want to disable managed collection and click its name.

    3. On the Details tab, scroll down to Features and change the state to Disabled by using the edit button.

To disable managed collection deployed by using Terraform, specify enabled = false in the managed_prometheus section of the google_container_cluster resource.

To disable managed collection deployed by using kubectl, run the following command:

kubectl delete -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/GoogleCloudPlatform/prometheus-engine/v0.7.0/manifests/operator.yaml

Disabling managed collection causes your cluster to stop sending new data to Managed Service for Prometheus. Taking this action does not delete any existing metrics data already stored in the system.

Disabling managed collection also deletes the gmp-public namespace and any resources within it, including any exporters installed in that namespace.

Run managed collection outside of GKE

In GKE environments, you can run managed collection without further configuration. In other Kubernetes environments, you need to explicitly provide credentials, a project-id value to contain your metrics, a location value (Google Cloud region) where your metrics will be stored, and a cluster value to save the name of the cluster in which the collector is running.

As gcloud does not work outside of Google Cloud environments, you need to deploy using kubectl instead. Unlike with gcloud, deploying managed collection using kubectl does not automatically upgrade your cluster when a new version is available. Remember to watch the releases page for new versions and manually upgrade by re-running the kubectl commands with the new version.

You can provide a service account key by modifying the OperatorConfig resource within operator.yaml as described in Provide credentials explicitly. You can provide project-id, location, and cluster values by adding them as args to the Deployment resource within operator.yaml.

We recommend choosing project-id based on your planned tenancy model for reads. Pick a project to store metrics in based on how you plan to organize reads later via metrics scopes. If you don't care, you can put everything into one project.

For location, we recommend choosing the nearest Google Cloud region to your deployment. The further the chosen Google Cloud region is from your deployment, the more write latency you'll have and the more you'll be affected by potential networking issues. You might want to consult this list of regions across multiple clouds. If you don't care, you can put everything into one Google Cloud region. You can't use global as your location.

For cluster, we recommend choosing the name of the cluster in which the operator is deployed.

When properly configured, your OperatorConfig should look like this:

    apiVersion: monitoring.googleapis.com/v1
    kind: OperatorConfig
    metadata:
      namespace: gmp-public
      name: config
    collection:
      credentials:
        name: gmp-test-sa
        key: key.json
    rules:
      credentials:
        name: gmp-test-sa
        key: key.json

And your Deployment resource should look like this:

apiVersion: apps/v1
kind: Deployment
...
spec:
  ...
  template:
    ...
    spec:
      ...
      containers:
      - name: operator
        ...
        args:
        - ...
        - "--project-id=PROJECT_ID"
        - "--cluster=CLUSTER_NAME"
        - "--location=REGION"

This example assumes you have set the REGION variable to a value like us-central1, for example.

Running Managed Service for Prometheus outside of Google Cloud incurs data ingress fees and might incur data egress fees if running on another cloud. In versions 0.5.0 and above, you can minimize these costs by enabling gzip compression through the OperatorConfig. Add the text shown in bold to the resource:

    apiVersion: monitoring.googleapis.com/v1
    kind: OperatorConfig
    metadata:
      namespace: gmp-public
      name: config
    collection:
      compression: gzip
      ...

Further reading on managed collection custom resources

For reference documentation about all the Managed Service for Prometheus custom resources, see the prometheus-engine/doc/api reference.

What's next