Configure workload identity federation with Active Directory

Stay organized with collections Save and categorize content based on your preferences.

This guide describes how to use workload identity federation to let workloads use Active Directory credentials to authenticate to Google Cloud.

If you're running Windows Server workloads in an Active Directory environment, then these workloads might have access to Active Directory credentials. For example:

  • A Windows Service might be configured to log on as a domain user.
  • An IIS application might be configured to run as a group managed service account (gMSA).

By using workload identity federation in combination with Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS), you can let these workloads exchange their Active Directory Kerberos credentials for short-lived Google Cloud credentials. Workloads can use these short-lived credentials to access Google Cloud APIs.

Exchanging Active Directory credentials against short-lived Google Cloud credentials works by chaining two token exchanges:

  1. A workload uses OpenID Connect (OIDC), SAML-POST, or WS-Trust to request an OIDC token or SAML assertion from AD FS. To authenticate to AD FS, the workload uses integrated Windows authentication (IWA) and its existing Active Directory credentials.
  2. The workload then uses workload identity federation to exchange the OIDC token or SAML assertion against an STS token and, optionally, to impersonate a Google Cloud service account.

This article shows you how you can automate this process in a way that doesn't require changes to your application by using the Workload Authenticator for Windows.

Prepare AD FS

You only need to perform these steps once.

Select a protocol

The way to prepare AD FS depends on which protocol you want to use:

  • SAML: You can let workloads use SAML or WS-Trust to obtain SAML assertions.

    To use SAML or WS-Trust, you create a relying party in AD FS and configure a workload identity pool to trust assertions issued for this relying party.

    A workload can use its Active Directory user to authenticate to AD FS, either by using the SAML-POST binding or WS-Trust. AD FS then issues a SAML assertion that contains information about the workload's Active Directory user and additional information such as group memberships.

    Using SAML or WS-Trust requires AD FS 3.0, AD FS for Windows Server 2016, or a newer version of AD FS.

  • OIDC: You can let workloads use OIDC to obtain OIDC tokens.

    To use OIDC, you create an OIDC client (native application) and an OIDC resource (Web API) in AD FS. You then configure a workload identity pool to trust access tokens issued for the Web API.

    A workload can use its Active Directory user and the OAuth client_credentials grant to authenticate to AD FS. AD FS then issues an access token, but no ID token.

    The access token contains information about the OIDC client application, but doesn't include any information about the workload's Active Directory user or its group memberships.

    Because access tokens don't contain any information about the Active Directory user, using OIDC can be less flexible than using SAML or WS-Trust.

    Using OIDC requires AD FS for Windows Server 2016 or a newer version of AD FS.

IWA prerequisites

This section describes IWA prerequisites that are required in order to use this guide.

If you haven't used IWA with AD FS before, make sure that you meet the following prerequisites:

Register the workload

To register your workload in AD FS, do the following:

OIDC

To let workloads use OIDC, you need two application registrations in AD FS:

  • An application registration of type native application or server application.

  • An application registration of type Web API that corresponds to a workload identity pool provider on Google Cloud.

Registering the client application

Create a client application that represents the workload. If you have multiple workloads that need access to Google Cloud, you might need to create multiple client applications.

To register a client application in AD FS, do the following:

  1. Open the AD FS MMC snap-in and navigate to Application Groups.
  2. Click Add application group.
  3. On the Welcome page, do the following:

    1. In the text field, enter a name for the client.
    2. Select Server application.
    3. Click Next.
  4. On the Server application page, do the following:

    1. In the text field, enter a client identifier (Client ID) and a redirect URI.

      If you're only planning to use the client_credentials grant type, the redirect URI won't be used and you can use a URI such as http://localhost/.

    2. Click Next.

  5. On the Configure application credentials page, do the following:

    1. Choose how the client authenticates. To use IWA, set Windows Integrated Authentication to enabled.
    2. Select the domain user that your application is configured to run as.
    3. Click Next.
  6. On the Summary page, review the settings and click Next.

  7. Click Close to dismiss the dialog.

Creating a Web API application for the workload identity federation pool

Create another application registration of type Web API. This application corresponds to a workload identity pool provider, and you use it to set up a trust relationship to Google Cloud.

To create the application in AD FS, do the following:

  1. Open the AD FS MMC snap-in and navigate to Application Groups.
  2. Click Add application group.
  3. On the Welcome page, enter a name such as Workload Identity Federation (test environment) and select Web API. Then click Next.
  4. On the Configure Web API page, enter a relying party identifier for the Web API.

    Instead of defining a custom relying party identifier, you can use the following URI as relying party identifier:

    https://iam.googleapis.com/projects/PROJECT_NUMBER/locations/global/workloadIdentityPools/POOL_ID/providers/PROVIDER_ID
    

    Replace the following:

    • PROJECT_NUMBER: the project number of the Google Cloud project that you use to create workload identity pool.
    • POOL_ID: an ID of your choice that identifies the workload identity pool. You must use the same ID when creating the workload identity pool later.
    • PROVIDER_ID: an ID of your choice that identifies the workload identity pool provider. You must use the same ID when you create the workload identity pool provider later.

    Formatting the URI this way ensures that the relying party identifier uniquely identifies a workload identity pool provider.

    You need the relying party identifier later when you configure the workload identity pool provider.

  5. Click Next.

  6. On the Apply access control policy page, select an appropriate access policy, then click Next.

  7. On the Configure application permissions page, add the client application that you created previously. Then click Next.

  8. On the Summary page, review the settings and click Next.

  9. Click Close to dismiss the dialog.

SAML or WS-Trust

Create a relying party trust in AD FS:

  1. Open the AD FS MMC snap-in.
  2. Navigate to Relying party trusts.
  3. Click Add relying party trust.
  4. On the Welcome page of the Add relying party trust wizard, do the following:
    1. Select Claims aware
    2. Click Start.
  5. On the Select data source page, do the following:
    1. Select Enter data about the relying party manually.
    2. Click Next.
  6. On the Specify display name page, do the following:

    1. Enter a name for the trust.
    2. Click Next.
  7. On the Configure certificate page, click Next. An encryption certificate isn't required because workload identity federation doesn't support encrypted SAML assertions.

  8. On the Configure URL page, do the following:

    SAML

    Use the following settings:

    • Set Enable support for the SAML 2.0 WebSSO protocol to enabled
    • In the Relying party SAML 2.0 SSO service URL field, enter the following URL:

      https://sts.googleapis.com/v1/token
      

    WS-Trust

    Keep the default settings

  9. Click Next.

  10. On the Configure identifiers page, enter a relying party identifier.

    Instead of defining a custom relying party identifier, you can use the following URI as relying party identifier:

    https://iam.googleapis.com/projects/PROJECT_NUMBER/locations/global/workloadIdentityPools/POOL_ID/providers/PROVIDER_ID
    

    Replace the following:

    • PROJECT_NUMBER: the project number of the Google Cloud project that you use to create workload identity pool.
    • POOL_ID: an ID of your choice that identifies the workload identity pool. You must use the same ID when creating the workload identity pool later.
    • PROVIDER_ID: an ID of your choice that identifies the workload identity pool provider. You must use the same ID when creating the workload identity pool provider later.

    Formatting the URI this way ensures that the relying party identifier uniquely identifies a workload identity pool provider.

    You need the relying party identifier later when you configure the workload identity pool provider.

  11. Click Next.

  12. On the Choose access control policy page, select an appropriate access control policy, then click Next.

  13. On the Ready to add trust page, review the settings and click Next.

  14. On the Finish page, click Close to dismiss the dialog.

To be compatible with workload identity federation, SAML assertions must contain at least one claim that uniquely identifies the Active Directory user. Typically, you use the Name ID claim for this purpose, which corresponds to the value of the NameID element in the SAML assertion.

To customize the SAML assertion's set of claims, you must edit the relying party trust's claim issuance policy. To edit the claim issuance policy, do the following:

  1. In the list of relying party trusts, select the trust that you just created and click Edit claim issuance policy.
  2. Click Add rule
  3. On the Choose rule type page of the Add transform claim rule wizard, do the following:
    1. Select Transform an incoming claim.
    2. Click Next.
  4. On the Configure claim rule page, configure the following settings:

    • Claim rule name: Name Identifier.
    • Incoming claim type: Select Primary SID, UPN, or a different claim to uniquely identify the subject.
    • Outgoing claim type: Name ID.
    • Outgoing name ID format: Unspecified.
  5. Select Pass through all claim values and click Finish.

  6. Optionally, configure additional rules to include more attributes in the SAML assertions.

  7. Click OK to close the claim issuance policy dialog.

Configure workload identity federation

You only need to perform these steps once per Azure AD tenant or AWS account want to federate with. You can then use the same workload identity pool and provider for multiple workloads and across multiple Google Cloud projects.

To start configuring workload identity federation, do the following:

  1. In the Google Cloud console, on the project selector page, select or create a Google Cloud project.

    Go to project selector

  2. It's best to use a dedicated project to manage workload identity pools and providers.
  3. Make sure that billing is enabled for your Cloud project. Learn how to check if billing is enabled on a project.

  4. Enable the IAM, Resource Manager, Service Account Credentials, and Security Token Service APIs.

    Enable the APIs

Define an attribute mapping and condition

The environment-specific credentials of your AWS or Azure workload contain multiple attributes, and you must decide which attribute you want to use as subject identifier (google.subject) in Google Cloud.

Optionally, you can map additional attributes. You can then refer to these additional attributes when granting access to resources.

OIDC

Your attribute mappings can use the claims embedded in AD FS access tokens as source attributes.

To authenticate an application, you can use the following attribute mapping:

google.subject=assertion.appid

This mapping sets google.subject to the value of the appid claim, which contains the Client ID of the AD FS application.

SAML or WS-Trust

Your attribute mappings can use the claims embedded in the assertion issued by AD FS, as described earlier in this guide.

Use the following mapping to let workload identity federation use the Name ID claim from the SAML assertion to uniquely identify the user:

google.subject=assertion.subject

If you've configured your claim issuance policy to include additional claims in SAML assertions, you can add additional mappings. For example:

google.groups=assertion.attributes['http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/claims/groupsid']
attribute.userip=['http://schemas.microsoft.com/2014/09/requestcontext/claims/userip'][0]

Optionally, define an attribute condition. Attribute conditions are CEL expressions that can check assertion attributes and target attributes. If the attribute condition evaluates to true for a given credential, the credential is accepted. Otherwise, the credential is rejected.

OIDC

You can use an attribute condition to restrict which clients can use workload identity federation to obtain short-lived Google Cloud tokens.

For example, the following condition defines that applications have to use IWA to authenticate to AD FS:

assertion.authmethod=='http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2008/06/identity/authenticationmethod/windows'

To control the list of applications that can obtain short-lived credentials for Google Cloud, do not define attribute conditions. Instead, use client permissions in AD FS to define which applications are allowed.

SAML or WS-Trust

You can use an attribute condition to restrict which Active Directory users can use workload identity federation to obtain short-lived Google Cloud tokens.

For example, the following condition only permits SAML assertions that include a certain group membership claim:

"S-1-5-6" in google.groups

Create the workload identity pool and provider

Required roles

To get the permissions that you need to configure workload identity federation, ask your administrator to grant you the following IAM roles on the project:

  • Workload Identity Pool Admin (roles/iam.workloadIdentityPoolAdmin)
  • Service Account Admin (roles/iam.serviceAccountAdmin)

For more information about granting roles, see Manage access.

Alternatively, the IAM Owner (roles/owner) basic role also includes permissions to configure identity federation. You should not grant basic roles in a production environment, but you can grant them in a development or test environment.

Console

  1. In the Google Cloud console, go to the New workload provider and pool page.

    Go to New workload provider and pool

  2. Under Create an identity pool, enter the following:

    • Name: Name for the pool. The name is also used as the pool ID. You can't change the pool ID later.
    • Description: Text that describes the purpose of the pool.
  3. Click Continue.

  4. Configure provider settings:

    OIDC

    • Select a provider: OpenID Connect (OIDC).
    • Provider name: the name of the provider. The name is also used as the provider ID. You cannot change the provider ID later.
    • Issuer URL: https://ADFS_DOMAIN/adfs where ADFS_DOMAIN is the public domain name of the AD FS server or farm.

    SAML

  5. Click Continue.

  6. Under Configure provider attributes, add the attribute mappings that you've identified previously.

  7. Under Attribute conditions, enter the attribute condition that you've identified previously. Leave the field blank if you don't have an attribute condition.

  8. Click Save to create the workload identity pool and provider.

gcloud

  1. Create a new workload identity pool:

    gcloud iam workload-identity-pools create POOL_ID \
        --location="global" \
        --description="DESCRIPTION" \
        --display-name="DISPLAY_NAME"
    

    Replace the following:

    • POOL_ID: Unique ID for the pool.
    • DISPLAY_NAME: Name of the pool.
    • DESCRIPTION: Description of the pool. This description appears when granting access to pool identities.
  2. Add a workload identity pool provider:

    OIDC

    gcloud iam workload-identity-pools providers create-oidc PROVIDER_ID \
        --location="global" \
        --workload-identity-pool="POOL_ID" \
        --issuer-uri="https://ADFS_DOMAIN/adfs" \
        --allowed-audiences="RELYING_PARTY_ID" \
        --attribute-mapping="MAPPINGS" \
        --attribute-condition="CONDITIONS"
    

    Replace the following:

    SAML or WS-Trust

    curl -O https://ADFS_DOMAIN/federationmetadata/2007-06/federationmetadata.xml
    
    gcloud iam workload-identity-pools providers create-saml PROVIDER_ID \
        --location="global" \
        --workload-identity-pool="POOL_ID" \
        --idp-metadata-path="federationmetadata.xml" \
        --attribute-mapping="MAPPINGS" \
        --attribute-condition="CONDITIONS"
    

    Replace the following:

    Example:

    gcloud iam workload-identity-pools providers create-saml example-provider \
        --location="global" \
        --workload-identity-pool="pool-1" \
        --idp-metadata-path="federationmetadata.xml" \
        --attribute-mapping=google.subject=assertion.subject"
    

Authenticate a workload

You must perform these steps once per workload.

Create a service account for the external workload

  1. Enable the IAM, Security Token Service, and Service Account Credentials APIs.

    Enable the APIs

  2. Create a service account that represents the workload. It's best to use a dedicated service account for each workload.

    The service account doesn't need to be in the same project as the workload identity pool.

  3. Grant the service account access to resources that you want external identities to access.

Allow the external workload to impersonate the service account

To allow external identities to impersonate a service account, you grant them the Workload Identity User role (roles/iam.workloadIdentityUser) on the service account. You can grant the role to a specific external identity, or to multiple external identities:

  • For a specific external identity, write an attribute condition that checks the google.subject attribute.
  • For a group of external identities, write an attribute condition that checks the google.groups attribute or a custom attribute attribute.NAME.
  • For all external identities in the workload identity pool, you do not use an attribute condition.

Console

To allow external identities to impersonate a service account using the Google Cloud console, do the following:

  1. In the Google Cloud console, go to the Workload Identity Pools page.

    Go to Workload Identity Pools

  2. Find the workload identity pool you want to update and select it.

  3. To grant access to the selected workload identity pool, click Grant access.

  4. In the Service account list, select the service account for the external identities to impersonate.

  5. To choose which identities in the pool can impersonate the service account, perform one of the following actions:

    • To allow only specific identities of the workload identity pool to impersonate the service account, select Only identities matching the filter.

      In the Attribute name list, select the attribute that you want to filter on.

      In the Attribute value field, enter the expected value of the attribute; for example, if you use an attribute mapping google.subject=assertion.sub, set Attribute name to subject and Attribute value to the value of the sub claim in tokens issued by your external identity provider.

    • To allow all external identities of the workload identity pool to impersonate the service account, select All identities in the pool.

  6. To save the configuration, click Save and then Dismiss.

gcloud

To allow external identities to impersonate a service account using gcloud CLI, do the following:

  1. To obtain the project number of your current project, execute the following command:

    gcloud projects describe $(gcloud config get-value core/project) --format=value\(projectNumber\)
    
  2. To grant the Workload Identity User role (roles/iam.workloadIdentityUser) to external identities that meet a certain criteria:

    By subject

    gcloud iam service-accounts add-iam-policy-binding SERVICE_ACCOUNT_EMAIL \
        --role=roles/iam.workloadIdentityUser \
        --member="principal://iam.googleapis.com/projects/PROJECT_NUMBER/locations/global/workloadIdentityPools/POOL_ID/subject/SUBJECT"
    

    By group

    gcloud iam service-accounts add-iam-policy-binding SERVICE_ACCOUNT_EMAIL \
        --role=roles/iam.workloadIdentityUser \
        --member="principalSet://iam.googleapis.com/projects/PROJECT_NUMBER/locations/global/workloadIdentityPools/POOL_ID/group/GROUP"
    

    By attribute

    gcloud iam service-accounts add-iam-policy-binding SERVICE_ACCOUNT_EMAIL \
        --role=roles/iam.workloadIdentityUser \
        --member="principalSet://iam.googleapis.com/projects/PROJECT_NUMBER/locations/global/workloadIdentityPools/POOL_ID/attribute.ATTRIBUTE_NAME/ATTRIBUTE_VALUE"
    

    All external identities

    gcloud iam service-accounts add-iam-policy-binding SERVICE_ACCOUNT_EMAIL \
        --role=roles/iam.workloadIdentityUser \
        --member="principalSet://iam.googleapis.com/projects/PROJECT_NUMBER/locations/global/workloadIdentityPools/POOL_ID/*"
    

    Replace the following:

    • SERVICE_ACCOUNT_EMAIL: the email address of the service account
    • PROJECT_NUMBER: the project number of the project that contains the workload identity pool
    • POOL_ID: the pool ID of the workload identity pool
    • SUBJECT: the expected value for the attribute that you've mapped to google.subject
    • GROUP: the expected value for the attribute that you've mapped to google.groups
    • ATTRIBUTE_NAME: the name of a custom attribute in your attribute mapping

Create a credential configuration

You can let Cloud Client Libraries and tools such as the gcloud CLI and Terraform use Active Directory credentials to authenticate to Google Cloud by using the Workload Authenticator for Windows.

Workload Authenticator for Windows is an open-source tool that acts as a plugin for the Cloud Client Libraries and tools such as the gcloud CLI:

  1. When the tool or library needs a new credential, it launches the Workload Authenticator in the background.
  2. The Workload Authenticator uses OIDC, SAML, or WS-Trust to obtain a new token or SAML assertion from AD FS and passes it back to the tool or library.
  3. The tool or library then uses exchanges the token or SAML assertion against short-lived Google Cloud credentials by using workload identity federation.

To use the Workload Authenticator for Windows, you must create a credential configuration file. This file defines the following:

  • Where to find the Workload Authenticator for Windows executable (wwauth.exe), and which parameters to run it with
  • Which workload identity pool and provider to use
  • Which service account to impersonate

To create a credential configuration file, do the following on the Windows Server that runs your workload:

  1. Right-click the Start button (or press Win+X) and click Windows PowerShell.
  2. Download the Workload Authenticator for Windows and save it to a location that's accessible by your workload:

    (New-Object Net.WebClient).DownloadFile(
      "https://github.com/GoogleCloudPlatform/iam-windows-authenticator/releases/latest/download/wwauth.exe",
      "${env:ProgramData}\wwauth.exe")
    

    If you create a credential configuration file by using the Workload Authenticator for Windows, the file contains the path to its executable. If you later delete or move the executable, workloads won't be able to find and use the executable.

  3. Launch wwauth.exe:

    & ${env:ProgramData}\wwauth.exe
    

    A configuration dialog opens:

    Workload Authenticator

  4. Select the AD FS tab and enter the following settings:

    • Issuer URI of AD FS server: Public URI of your AD FS server or farm.

      https://ADFS_DOMAIN/adfs/
      

      Replace ADFS_DOMAIN with the public domain name of your AD FS server or server farm.

    The next settings depend on the protocol you want to use:

    OIDC

    • Protocol: AdfsOidc
    • Relying party ID: Keep the default.
    • Client ID Client identifier (Client ID) of the server application in AD FS.

    SAML

    • Protocol: AdfsSamlPost
    • Assertion consumer service URL: https://sts.googleapis.com/v1/token.
    • Sign requests using certificate: disabled

    WS-Trust

    • Protocol: AdfsWsTrust
  5. Select the Workload identity tab and enter the following settings:

    • Project number: Project number of the project that contains the workload identity pool
    • Pool ID: ID of the workload identity pool
    • Provider ID: ID of the workload identity pool provider
    • Impersonate service account: enabled
    • Email address: Email address of the service account
  6. Select the AD FS tab and verify that the Relying Party ID field now contains the URL of your workload identity pool provider.

  7. Click Apply and choose a file location to save the credential configuration file to.

    Unlike a service account key, a credential configuration file doesn't contain any secrets and doesn't need to be kept confidential. Details about the credential configuration file are available at https://google.aip.dev/auth/4117.

You're now ready to test your configuration:

  1. Select an Active Directory user to test with. This can be the Active Directory user of the workload or the user you're currently logged in with.

  2. To test the configuration with your current user, click Test.

    To test with a different user, select Test > Test configuration as user and enter the credentials for the user.

    The tool now tries to authenticate to Google Cloud by performing the following steps:

    1. Acquire an OIDC token or SAML assertion from AD FS.
    2. Obtain a Google STS token.
    3. Impersonate the service account.

    If the authentication succeeds, you see the message Test completed successfully:

    Test result

Using the credential configuration to access Google Cloud

To let tools and client libraries use your credential configuration, do the following on the Windows Server that runs your workload:

  1. Right-click the Start button and click Run.
  2. Enter sysdm.cpl and click OK.
  3. On the Advanced tab, click Environment variables.
  4. In the System variables section, add two new variables:

    Name Value
    GOOGLE_APPLICATION_CREDENTIALS Path to the credential configuration file
    GOOGLE_EXTERNAL_ACCOUNT_ALLOW_EXECUTABLES 1
  5. Click OK.

  6. Use a client library or tool that supports workload identity federation and can find credentials automatically:

    C++

    Most of the Google Cloud Client Libraries for C++ support identity federation using a ChannelCredentials object, which is created by calling grpc::GoogleDefaultCredentials(). To initialize this credential, you must build the client libraries with version 1.36.0 or later of gRPC.

    The Cloud Storage Client Library for C++ uses the REST API, not gRPC, so it doesn't support identity federation.

    Go

    Client libraries for Go support identity federation if they use version v0.0.0-20210218202405-ba52d332ba99 or later of the golang.org/x/oauth2 module.

    To check which version of this module your client library uses, run the following commands:

    cd $GOPATH/src/cloud.google.com/go
    go list -m golang.org/x/oauth2
    

    Java

    Client libraries for Java support identity federation if they use version 0.24.0 or later of the com.google.auth:google-auth-library-oauth2-http artifact.

    To check which version of this artifact your client library uses, run the following Maven command in your application directory:

    mvn dependency:list -DincludeArtifactIds=google-auth-library-oauth2-http
    

    Node.js

    Client libraries for Node.js support workload identity federation if they use version 7.0.2 or later of the google-auth-library package.

    To check which version of this package your client library uses, run the following command in your application directory:

    npm list google-auth-library
    

    When you create a GoogleAuth object, you can specify a project ID, or you can allow GoogleAuth to find the project ID automatically. To find the project ID automatically, the service account in the configuration file must have the Browser role (roles/browser), or a role with equivalent permissions, on your project. For details, see the README for the google-auth-library package.

    Python

    Client libraries for Python support identity federation if they use version 1.27.0 or later of the google-auth package.

    To check which version of this package your client library uses, run the following command in the environment where the package is installed:

    pip show google-auth
    

    To specify a project ID for the authentication client, you can set the GOOGLE_CLOUD_PROJECT environment variable, or you can allow the client to find the project ID automatically. To find the project ID automatically, the service account in the configuration file must have the Browser role (roles/browser), or a role with equivalent permissions, on your project. For details, see the user guide for the google-auth package.

    gcloud

    To authenticate using workload identity federation, use the gcloud auth login command:

    gcloud auth login --cred-file=FILEPATH.json
    

    Replace FILEPATH with the file path to the credential configuration file.

    Support for workload identity federation in gcloud CLI is available in version 363.0.0 and later versions of the gcloud CLI.

    Terraform

    The Google Cloud provider supports workload identity federation if you use version 3.61.0 or later:

    terraform {
      required_providers {
        google = {
          source  = "hashicorp/google"
          version = "~> 3.61.0"
        }
      }
    }
    

    gsutil

    To authenticate using workload identity federation, use one of the following methods:

    When you use gsutil in conjunction with gcloud, sign in as normal:

    gcloud auth login --cred-file=FILEPATH.json
    

    When you use gsutil as a stand-alone command-line application, edit the .boto file to include the following section:

    [Credentials]
    gs_external_account_file = FILEPATH
    

    Replace FILEPATH, in both cases, with the file path to the credential configuration file.

    Support for workload identity federation in gsutil is available in version 379.0.0 and later versions of the gcloud CLI.

    bq

    To authenticate using workload identity federation, use the gcloud auth login command, as follows:

    gcloud auth login --cred-file=FILEPATH.json
    

    Replace FILEPATH with the file path to the credential configuration file.

    Support for workload identity federation in bq is available in version 390.0.0 and later versions of the gcloud CLI.

What's next