Exposing Information Using Outputs

When you create a deployment, you might want to expose key properties of your configurations or templates for other templates or users to consume. For example, you might want to expose the IP address of a database created in a template so users can easily reference the IP when configuring their own templates.

You can use the outputs section in your template or configuration to define a list of key/values pairs that users can call. In the outputs section, you define arbitrary keys and set the value of the keys to a reference, a template property, or an environment variable. Users can consume outputs to access key information about resources created by the template. For example, you can declare an output called databaseIP that references the IP address of an instance hosting a database and users can reference that output in other templates in the same deployment.

Before you begin

Example

Here is an example template with outputs:

mongodb.jinja
{% set MASTER = env["name"] + "-" + env["deployment"] + "-mongodb" %}
resources:
- name: {{ MASTER }}
  type: instance
  ...
outputs:
- name: databaseIp
  value: $(ref.{{ MASTER }}.network[0].ip)  # Treated as a string during expansion
- name: databasePort
  value: 88

The outputs section declares two properties: databaseIp and databasePort. databaseIp uses a reference that resolves to the network IP address of the master resource, while databasePort is a static value. In another template, you can import mongodb.jinja, use the template as a type, and call the outputs. For example:

imports:
- path: example/path/to/mongodb.jinja
  name: mongodb.jinja

resources:
- name: my_mongo
  type: mongodb.jinja
  properties:
    size: 100

- name: my_instance
  type: compute.v1.instance
  properties:
    …
    databaseIp: $(ref.my_mongo.databaseIp)
    databasePort: $(ref.my_mongo.port)

Declaring an output

Declare an output in either a template or a configuration by defining an outputs: section at the same level as the resources: section. Output keys must be unique within the template or configuration.

For example, a sample outputs: section might look like this:

...
outputs:
- name: databaseIp
  value: $(ref.my-first-vm.networkInterfaces[0].accessConfigs[0].natIP)
- name: machineType
  value: {{ properties['machineType'] }}
- name: databasePort
  value: 88

Here's how the outputs might look in a full template:

{#
Copyright 2016 Google Inc. All rights reserved.
Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
You may obtain a copy of the License at
    http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
limitations under the License.
#}

resources:
- name: my-first-vm
  type: compute.v1.instance
  properties:
    zone: us-central1-a
    machineType: zones/us-central1-a/machineTypes/{{ properties['machineType'] }}
    disks:
    - deviceName: boot
      type: PERSISTENT
      boot: true
      autoDelete: true
      initializeParams:
        sourceImage: projects/debian-cloud/global/images/family/debian-9
    networkInterfaces:
    - network: global/networks/default
      accessConfigs:
      - name: External NAT
        type: ONE_TO_ONE_NAT

# Declare outputs here
outputs:
- name: databaseIp
  value: $(ref.my-first-vm.networkInterfaces[0].accessConfigs[0].natIP)
- name: machineType
  value: {{ properties['machineType'] }}
- name: databasePort
  value: 88


Output values can be:

Using outputs from templates

To use an output that has been defined in a template, import and use the template containing the output as a type. For example, to use outputs defined in a template called template_with_outputs.jinja, it must be imported and used to create a resource:

# Copyright 2016 Google Inc. All rights reserved.
#
# Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
# you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
# You may obtain a copy of the License at
#
#     http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
#
# Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
# distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
# WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
# See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
# limitations under the License.
imports:
- path: template_with_outputs.jinja
  name: template.jinja

resources:
- name: my-first-vm
  type: template.jinja
  properties:
    machineType: n1-standard-1

outputs:
- name: databaseIp
  value: $(ref.my-first-vm.databaseIp)
- name: machineType
  value: $(ref.my-first-vm.machineType)
- name: databasePort
  value: $(ref.my-first-vm.databasePort)


To call an output, use the following format:

$(ref.RESOURCE.OUTPUT)
  • RESOURCE is the name of the resource created by the template. In the example above, this is my-first-vm.

  • OUTPUT is the output declared in the template. In the example above, this would be databaseIp and databasePort. This is the same syntax that you use to declare references. You can reference list items as well, for example: $ref.template.property[0].

When you deploy the configuration, Deployment Manager expands the configuration, and then replaces references to outputs with the output values.

Describing outputs in schemas

For templates that have accompanying schemas, you can describe output properties in further details. Deployment Manager does not enforce or validate any information in the outputs section but it is potentially helpful to use this section to provide more information about relevant outputs, for the benefit of users using your templates.

In your schema file, provide an outputs section that matches the output in your template. For example:

...
outputs:
  databaseIp:
    description: Reference to ip address of your new cluster
    type: string
  databasePort:
    description: Port to talk on
    type: integer

Users can reference your schema file to understand the usage and type of your outputs.

Looking up final output values

After you deploy templates that use outputs, view the final output values by viewing the configuration layout of the deployment. Final output values are indicated by the finalValue property. All output values are included in this field, including output values from nested templates. For example:

layout: |
  resources:
  - name: vm_template
    outputs:
    - finalValue: 104.197.69.69
      name: databaseIp
      value: $(ref.vm-test.networkInterfaces[0].accessConfigs[0].natIP)
    properties:
      zone: us-central1-a
    resources:
    - name: datadisk-example-instance
      type: compute.v1.disk
    - name: vm-test
      type: compute.v1.instance
    type: vm_template.jinja
name: manifest-1455057116997

Avoid circular dependencies

Be careful when creating templates where two or more resources rely on outputs from each other. Deployment Manager does not prevent this structure but if the outputs caused a circular dependency, the deployment won't deploy successfully. For example, the following snippet is accepted by Deployment Manager but if the contents of the templates causes a circular dependency, the deployment would fail:

resources:
- name: frontend
  type: frontend.jinja
  properties:
    ip: $(ref.backend.ip)
- name: backend
  type: backend.jinja
  properties:
    ip: $(ref.frontend.ip)

As an example of a circular dependency where the deployment fails, assume both frontend.jinja and backend.jinja looked like this:

resources:
- name: {{ env['name'] }}
  type: compute.v1.instance
  properties:
    zone: us-central1-f
    ...
    networkInterfaces:
    - network: global/networks/default
      accessConfigs:
      - name: External NAT
        type: ONE_TO_ONE_NAT
    metadata:
      items:
      - key: startup-script
        value: |
          #!/bin/bash
          export IP={{ properties["ip"] }}
      ...

outputs:
- name: ip
  value: $(ref.{{ env['name'] }}.networkInterfaces[0]accessConfigs[0].natIP)

Recall that both resources used the IP output property from the opposing resource:

resources:
- name: frontend
  type: frontend.jinja
  properties:
    ip: $(ref.backend.ip)
- name: backend
  type: backend.jinja
  properties:
    ip: $(ref.frontend.ip)

But neither IP values can be populated because both properties rely on the existence of the other resource, creating a circular dependency. Here is the same template, fully expanded:

resources:
- name: frontend
  type: compute.v1.instance
  properties:
    zone: us-central1-f
    ...
    networkInterfaces:
    - network: global/networks/default
      accessConfigs:
      - name: External NAT
        type: ONE_TO_ONE_NAT
    metadata:
      items:
      - key: startup-script
        value: |
          #!/bin/bash
          export IP=$(ref.backend.networkInterfaces[0]accessConfigs[0].natIP)
- name: backend
  type: compute.v1.instance
  properties:
    zone: us-central1-f
    ...
    networkInterfaces:
    - network: global/networks/default
      accessConfigs:
      - name: External NAT
        type: ONE_TO_ONE_NAT
    metadata:
      items:
      - key: startup-script
        value: |
          #!/bin/bash
          export IP=$(ref.frontend.networkInterfaces[0]accessConfigs[0].natIP)

Deployment Manager returns an error if you try to run configuration:

 code: u'CONDITION_NOT_MET'
 message: u'A dependency cycle was found amongst backend, frontend.'>]>

However, this template would work if:

  1. frontend.jinja created two virtual machine instances, vm-1 and vm-2.
  2. backend.jinja created vm-3 and vm-4.
  3. vm-1 exposed it's external IP as an output and vm-4 used that output.
  4. vm-3 exposed an external IP as an output, vm-2 used that output.

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