Interface DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfoOrBuilder

public static interface DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfoOrBuilder extends MessageOrBuilder

Implements

MessageOrBuilder

Methods

getLocation(int index)

public abstract DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location getLocation(int index)


A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which
corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended
to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar
tools.
For example, say we have a file like:
message Foo {
optional string foo = 1;
}
Let's look at just the field definition:
optional string foo = 1;
^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^
a bc de f ghi
We have the following locations:
span path represents
[a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition.
[a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional).
[c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string).
[e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo).
[g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1).
Notes:
- A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any
particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are
logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire
extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will
have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated
field without an index.
- Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single
logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most
obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple
extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
- A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For
example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the
beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within
the block.
- Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span
does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines
both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations
corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
- Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to
ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could
be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameter
NameDescription
indexint
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location

getLocationCount()

public abstract int getLocationCount()


A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which
corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended
to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar
tools.
For example, say we have a file like:
message Foo {
optional string foo = 1;
}
Let's look at just the field definition:
optional string foo = 1;
^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^
a bc de f ghi
We have the following locations:
span path represents
[a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition.
[a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional).
[c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string).
[e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo).
[g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1).
Notes:
- A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any
particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are
logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire
extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will
have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated
field without an index.
- Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single
logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most
obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple
extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
- A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For
example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the
beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within
the block.
- Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span
does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines
both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations
corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
- Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to
ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could
be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Returns
TypeDescription
int

getLocationList()

public abstract List<DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location> getLocationList()


A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which
corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended
to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar
tools.
For example, say we have a file like:
message Foo {
optional string foo = 1;
}
Let's look at just the field definition:
optional string foo = 1;
^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^
a bc de f ghi
We have the following locations:
span path represents
[a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition.
[a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional).
[c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string).
[e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo).
[g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1).
Notes:
- A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any
particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are
logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire
extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will
have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated
field without an index.
- Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single
logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most
obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple
extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
- A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For
example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the
beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within
the block.
- Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span
does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines
both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations
corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
- Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to
ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could
be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Returns
TypeDescription
List<Location>

getLocationOrBuilder(int index)

public abstract DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.LocationOrBuilder getLocationOrBuilder(int index)


A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which
corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended
to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar
tools.
For example, say we have a file like:
message Foo {
optional string foo = 1;
}
Let's look at just the field definition:
optional string foo = 1;
^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^
a bc de f ghi
We have the following locations:
span path represents
[a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition.
[a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional).
[c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string).
[e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo).
[g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1).
Notes:
- A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any
particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are
logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire
extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will
have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated
field without an index.
- Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single
logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most
obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple
extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
- A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For
example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the
beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within
the block.
- Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span
does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines
both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations
corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
- Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to
ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could
be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameter
NameDescription
indexint
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.LocationOrBuilder

getLocationOrBuilderList()

public abstract List<? extends DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.LocationOrBuilder> getLocationOrBuilderList()


A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which
corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended
to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar
tools.
For example, say we have a file like:
message Foo {
optional string foo = 1;
}
Let's look at just the field definition:
optional string foo = 1;
^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^
a bc de f ghi
We have the following locations:
span path represents
[a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition.
[a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional).
[c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string).
[e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo).
[g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1).
Notes:
- A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any
particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are
logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire
extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will
have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated
field without an index.
- Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single
logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most
obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple
extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
- A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For
example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the
beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within
the block.
- Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span
does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines
both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations
corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
- Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to
ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could
be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Returns
TypeDescription
List<? extends com.google.protobuf.DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.LocationOrBuilder>