Class DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder

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public static final class DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder extends GeneratedMessageV3.Builder<DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder> implements DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfoOrBuilder

Encapsulates information about the original source file from which a FileDescriptorProto was generated.

Protobuf type google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo

Static Methods

getDescriptor()

public static final Descriptors.Descriptor getDescriptor()
Returns
TypeDescription
Descriptors.Descriptor

Methods

addAllLocation(Iterable<? extends DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location> values)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder addAllLocation(Iterable<? extends DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location> values)

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameter
NameDescription
valuesIterable<? extends com.google.protobuf.DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location>
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder

addLocation(DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location value)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder addLocation(DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location value)

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameter
NameDescription
valueDescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder

addLocation(DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder builderForValue)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder addLocation(DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder builderForValue)

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameter
NameDescription
builderForValueDescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder

addLocation(int index, DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location value)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder addLocation(int index, DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location value)

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameters
NameDescription
indexint
valueDescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder

addLocation(int index, DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder builderForValue)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder addLocation(int index, DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder builderForValue)

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameters
NameDescription
indexint
builderForValueDescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder

addLocationBuilder()

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder addLocationBuilder()

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder

addLocationBuilder(int index)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder addLocationBuilder(int index)

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameter
NameDescription
indexint
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder

addRepeatedField(Descriptors.FieldDescriptor field, Object value)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder addRepeatedField(Descriptors.FieldDescriptor field, Object value)
Parameters
NameDescription
fieldDescriptors.FieldDescriptor
valueObject
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder
Overrides

build()

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo build()
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo

buildPartial()

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo buildPartial()
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo

clear()

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder clear()

Called by the initialization and clear code paths to allow subclasses to reset any of their builtin fields back to the initial values.

Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder
Overrides

clearField(Descriptors.FieldDescriptor field)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder clearField(Descriptors.FieldDescriptor field)
Parameter
NameDescription
fieldDescriptors.FieldDescriptor
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder
Overrides

clearLocation()

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder clearLocation()

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder

clearOneof(Descriptors.OneofDescriptor oneof)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder clearOneof(Descriptors.OneofDescriptor oneof)

TODO(jieluo): Clear it when all subclasses have implemented this method.

Parameter
NameDescription
oneofDescriptors.OneofDescriptor
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder
Overrides

clone()

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder clone()

Clones the Builder.

Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder
Overrides

getDefaultInstanceForType()

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo getDefaultInstanceForType()

Get an instance of the type with no fields set. Because no fields are set, all getters for singular fields will return default values and repeated fields will appear empty. This may or may not be a singleton. This differs from the getDefaultInstance() method of generated message classes in that this method is an abstract method of the MessageLite interface whereas getDefaultInstance() is a static method of a specific class. They return the same thing.

Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo

getDescriptorForType()

public Descriptors.Descriptor getDescriptorForType()

Get the message's type's descriptor. This differs from the getDescriptor() method of generated message classes in that this method is an abstract method of the Message interface whereas getDescriptor() is a static method of a specific class. They return the same thing.

Returns
TypeDescription
Descriptors.Descriptor
Overrides

getLocation(int index)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location getLocation(int index)

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameter
NameDescription
indexint
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location

getLocationBuilder(int index)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder getLocationBuilder(int index)

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameter
NameDescription
indexint
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder

getLocationBuilderList()

public List<DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder> getLocationBuilderList()

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Returns
TypeDescription
List<Builder>

getLocationCount()

public int getLocationCount()

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Returns
TypeDescription
int

getLocationList()

public List<DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location> getLocationList()

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Returns
TypeDescription
List<Location>

getLocationOrBuilder(int index)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.LocationOrBuilder getLocationOrBuilder(int index)

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameter
NameDescription
indexint
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.LocationOrBuilder

getLocationOrBuilderList()

public List<? extends DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.LocationOrBuilder> getLocationOrBuilderList()

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Returns
TypeDescription
List<? extends com.google.protobuf.DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.LocationOrBuilder>

internalGetFieldAccessorTable()

protected GeneratedMessageV3.FieldAccessorTable internalGetFieldAccessorTable()

Get the FieldAccessorTable for this type. We can't have the message class pass this in to the constructor because of bootstrapping trouble with DescriptorProtos.

Returns
TypeDescription
GeneratedMessageV3.FieldAccessorTable
Overrides

isInitialized()

public final boolean isInitialized()

Returns true if all required fields in the message and all embedded messages are set, false otherwise.

See also: MessageOrBuilder#getInitializationErrorString()

Returns
TypeDescription
boolean
Overrides

mergeFrom(CodedInputStream input, ExtensionRegistryLite extensionRegistry)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder mergeFrom(CodedInputStream input, ExtensionRegistryLite extensionRegistry)

Like Builder#mergeFrom(CodedInputStream), but also parses extensions. The extensions that you want to be able to parse must be registered in extensionRegistry. Extensions not in the registry will be treated as unknown fields.

Parameters
NameDescription
inputCodedInputStream
extensionRegistryExtensionRegistryLite
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder
Overrides Exceptions
TypeDescription
IOException

mergeFrom(DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo other)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder mergeFrom(DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo other)
Parameter
NameDescription
otherDescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder

mergeFrom(Message other)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder mergeFrom(Message other)

Merge other into the message being built. other must have the exact same type as this (i.e. getDescriptorForType() == other.getDescriptorForType()).

Merging occurs as follows. For each field:

  • For singular primitive fields, if the field is set in other, then other's value overwrites the value in this message.
  • For singular message fields, if the field is set in other, it is merged into the corresponding sub-message of this message using the same merging rules.
  • For repeated fields, the elements in other are concatenated with the elements in this message.
  • For oneof groups, if the other message has one of the fields set, the group of this message is cleared and replaced by the field of the other message, so that the oneof constraint is preserved.

    This is equivalent to the Message::MergeFrom method in C++.

Parameter
NameDescription
otherMessage
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder
Overrides

mergeUnknownFields(UnknownFieldSet unknownFields)

public final DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder mergeUnknownFields(UnknownFieldSet unknownFields)

Merge some unknown fields into the UnknownFieldSet for this message.

Parameter
NameDescription
unknownFieldsUnknownFieldSet
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder
Overrides

removeLocation(int index)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder removeLocation(int index)

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameter
NameDescription
indexint
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder

setField(Descriptors.FieldDescriptor field, Object value)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder setField(Descriptors.FieldDescriptor field, Object value)
Parameters
NameDescription
fieldDescriptors.FieldDescriptor
valueObject
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder
Overrides

setLocation(int index, DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location value)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder setLocation(int index, DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location value)

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameters
NameDescription
indexint
valueDescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder

setLocation(int index, DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder builderForValue)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder setLocation(int index, DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder builderForValue)

A Location identifies a piece of source code in a .proto file which corresponds to a particular definition. This information is intended to be useful to IDEs, code indexers, documentation generators, and similar tools. For example, say we have a file like: message Foo { optional string foo = 1; } Let's look at just the field definition: optional string foo = 1; ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^^ a bc de f ghi We have the following locations: span path represents [a,i) [ 4, 0, 2, 0 ] The whole field definition. [a,b) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 4 ] The label (optional). [c,d) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 5 ] The type (string). [e,f) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 1 ] The name (foo). [g,h) [ 4, 0, 2, 0, 3 ] The number (1). Notes:

  • A location may refer to a repeated field itself (i.e. not to any particular index within it). This is used whenever a set of elements are logically enclosed in a single code segment. For example, an entire extend block (possibly containing multiple extension definitions) will have an outer location whose path refers to the "extensions" repeated field without an index.
  • Multiple locations may have the same path. This happens when a single logical declaration is spread out across multiple places. The most obvious example is the "extend" block again -- there may be multiple extend blocks in the same scope, each of which will have the same path.
  • A location's span is not always a subset of its parent's span. For example, the "extendee" of an extension declaration appears at the beginning of the "extend" block and is shared by all extensions within the block.
  • Just because a location's span is a subset of some other location's span does not mean that it is a descendant. For example, a "group" defines both a type and a field in a single declaration. Thus, the locations corresponding to the type and field and their components will overlap.
  • Code which tries to interpret locations should probably be designed to ignore those that it doesn't understand, as more types of locations could be recorded in the future.

repeated .google.protobuf.SourceCodeInfo.Location location = 1;

Parameters
NameDescription
indexint
builderForValueDescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Location.Builder
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder

setRepeatedField(Descriptors.FieldDescriptor field, int index, Object value)

public DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder setRepeatedField(Descriptors.FieldDescriptor field, int index, Object value)
Parameters
NameDescription
fieldDescriptors.FieldDescriptor
indexint
valueObject
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder
Overrides

setUnknownFields(UnknownFieldSet unknownFields)

public final DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder setUnknownFields(UnknownFieldSet unknownFields)
Parameter
NameDescription
unknownFieldsUnknownFieldSet
Returns
TypeDescription
DescriptorProtos.SourceCodeInfo.Builder
Overrides