Edit on GitHub
Report issue
Page history

Migrate an Oracle database to Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL using Datastream

Author(s): @ktchana ,   Published: 2021-05-26

Thomas Chan | Solutions Architect | Google

Contributed by Google employees.

This tutorial shows you how to migrate a database from Oracle® to Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL using Datastream, a Dataflow template, a customized setup for Ora2Pg, and an open source validation tool developed by Google.

Migration pipeline using Datastream

This tutorial is part of a series that shows you how to migrate a database from Oracle to Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL. For detailed discussions of migration-related concepts, see the other documents in the series:

This tutorial is intended for a technical audience who is responsible for database management and migration. This tutorial assumes that you're familiar with concepts related to database administration, including schema conversion and change data capture. This tutorial also assumes that you have some familiarity with shell scripts and basic knowledge of Google Cloud.

Objectives

  • Understand the process, prerequisites, notable behaviors, and limitations of the method used by this tutorial.
  • Set up a Google Cloud project with the following resources:
    • a bastion VM for schema conversion
    • a Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL database as the target database
    • a Cloud Storage bucket to store schema conversion output and replicated data
    • a Pub/Sub topic subscription to track changes to the Cloud Storage bucket
  • Create a demonstration schema in the Oracle database to be used for data migration.
  • Perform schema conversion using Ora2pg.
  • Create a Datastream stream to perform initial loads and change data capture (CDC) replication from the source database.
  • Create a template-based Dataflow job to load data into the target database.
  • Verify that the replication is successful.
  • Validate the correctness of the replicated data.

Costs

This tutorial uses billable components of Google Cloud, including the following:

Use the pricing calculator to generate a cost estimate based on your projected usage.

Source database requirements

For the migration to be successful, you must ensure that several requirements are satisfied on the source Oracle database, to ensure compatibility with the toolchain used in this tutorial. For up-to-date information about version requirements, see the Datastream documentation.

  • Version: Oracle 10g v10.2, 11g v11.2.0.4, 12c v12.1.0.2/1, 18c, or 19c

  • Single instance or Real Application Clusters (RAC): Both are supported. The Single Client Access Name (SCAN) listener is not supported; use the local or VIP listener instead.

  • Multi-tenancy: Container databases (CDB), pluggable databases (PDB), and autonomous databases are not supported.

  • Change replication: LogMiner with supplemental logging is required.

  • Size:

    • Tables of up to 100 GB.

      This is a soft limit, and Datastream will attempt to perform backfill on any table that you supply. However, we recommend that you use tools such as Ora2Pg to perform initial loads for tables that exceed this soft limit.

  • Throughput: Approximately 5 MB per second, with a maximum 3 MB row size limit.

    • Throughput is a soft limit. Larger throughputs may incur replication delays and potentially lost log positions.
    • Rows larger than 3 MB are discarded.
  • Network connectivity: For the migration to work, both the Datastream service and a Compute Engine instance hosting the migration utilities need to connect to the source Oracle database. For details, see the Datastream network connectivity options.

Notable behaviors and limitations

This section describes notable behaviors and limitations of the migration process. It is important for you to understand these behaviors and limitations and plan ahead to avoid running into problems during the migration. For up-to-date information about known limitations, see the Datastream documentation.

  • Primary key and ROWID: We recommend that you have a primary key on all tables.

    Migration will work for all tables, with the following caveats:

    • For tables that don’t have a primary key, the Oracle ROWID is added to each table as a BIGINT primary key column to work as a substitute for a primary key. ROWID is stable for the life of a row, but it can change during Oracle table cleanup. The PostgreSQL row ID column will be stable to use as a primary key after promotion.
    • For tables with a primary key, the row ID will be copied as an indexed BIGINT column. It is required to maintain consistency during CDC replication.
  • DML only: No DDL changes are supported during replication.

  • Column support:

    • Columns of data types ANYDATA, BLOB, CLOB, LONG/LONG RAW, NCLOB, UDT, UROWID, XMLTYPE aren't supported, and will be replaced with NULL values.

    • For Oracle database 11g, tables that have columns of data types ANYDATA or UDT aren't supported, and the entire table won't be replicated.

  • Deferred constraints are converted to non-deferred constraints as part of the standard conversion. This can be customized by setting FKEY_DEFERRABLE=0 in the ora2pg.conf configuration file.

  • Unsupported features in the Oracle database:

    • External tables
    • DBLinks
    • Index Only Tables (IOTs)
    • Oracle Label Security (OLS)
  • Replication lag: Datastream uses Oracle LogMiner to capture changes from archived redo log files. Recently changed data will not be visible to Datastream until a log switch occurs and the current redo log file is archived. It is important to force a log switch before the final migration cutover to make sure that Datastream captures and replicates all changes to the destination Cloud SQL instance.

Set up a Google Cloud project

For this tutorial, you need a Google Cloud project. To make cleanup easiest at the end of the tutorial, we recommend that you create a new project for this tutorial.

  1. Create a Google Cloud project.
  2. Make sure that billing is enabled for your Google Cloud project.

When you finish this tutorial, you can avoid continued billing by deleting the resources you created. For instructions, see the "Cleaning up" section at the end of this tutorial.

Deploy migration resources

  1. In Cloud Shell, enable APIs for the Compute Engine, Cloud Storage, Dataflow, Cloud SQL, and Datastream services:

    gcloud services enable \
        compute.googleapis.com \
        storage.googleapis.com \
        dataflow.googleapis.com \
        sqladmin.googleapis.com \
        pubsub.googleapis.com \
        datastream.googleapis.com
    
  2. Set environment variables:

    # Google Cloud project to use for this tutorial
    export PROJECT_ID="[YOUR_PROJECT_ID]"
    
    # Google Cloud region to use for Cloud SQL, Compute Engine, Datastream, and Cloud Storage bucket
    export GCP_REGION_ID="[YOUR_GOOGLE_CLOUD_REGION]"
    
    # Google Cloud zone to use for hosting the bastion Compute Engine instance
    export GCP_ZONE_ID="[YOUR_GOOGLE_CLOUD_ZONE]"
    
    # Name of the bastion VM
    export BASTION_VM_NAME="[NAME_OF_BASTION_COMPUTE_ENGINE_INSTANCE]"
    
    # Name of the Cloud Storage bucket used to host schema conversion outputs
    export GCS_BUCKET="[YOUR_CLOUD_STORAGE_BUCKET]"
    
    # Name of the Pub/Sub topic for Cloud Storage notifications
    export PUBSUB_TOPIC="[YOUR_PUB_SUB_TOPIC]"
    
    # ID of the Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL instance
    export CLOUD_SQL="[CLOUD_SQL_INSTANCE_ID]"
    
    # Target Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL version (e.g., POSTGRES_12)
    export CLOUD_SQL_PG_VERSION="[CLOUD_SQL_PG_VERSION]"
    
  3. Create the bastion Compute Engine VM instance:

    gcloud compute instances create ${BASTION_VM_NAME} \
        --zone=${GCP_ZONE_ID} \
        --boot-disk-device-name=${BASTION_VM_NAME} \
        --boot-disk-size=10GB \
        --boot-disk-type=pd-balanced \
        --image-family=debian-10 \
        --image-project=debian-cloud
    
  4. Create the Cloud Storage bucket used to host schema conversion output:

    gsutil mb -p ${PROJECT_ID} "gs://${GCS_BUCKET}"
    
  5. Set up Pub/Sub notifications for Cloud Storage, which are used by the Dataflow template to pick up changes output by Datastream:

    export PUBSUB_SUBSCRIPTION=${PUBSUB_TOPIC}-subscription
    
    gcloud pubsub topics create ${PUBSUB_TOPIC} --project=${PROJECT_ID}
    
    gcloud pubsub subscriptions create ${PUBSUB_SUBSCRIPTION} \
        --topic=${PUBSUB_TOPIC} \
        --project=${PROJECT_ID}
    
    gsutil notification create -f "json" \
        -p "ora2pg/" \
        -t "projects/${PROJECT_ID}/topics/${PUBSUB_TOPIC}" \
        "gs://${GCS_BUCKET}"
    
  6. Create the target Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL instance and give the associated service account the necessary role:

    gcloud beta sql instances create ${CLOUD_SQL} \
        --database-version=${CLOUD_SQL_PG_VERSION} \
        --cpu=4 --memory=3840MiB \
        --region=${REGION} \
        --no-assign-ip \
        --network=default \
        --root-password=${DATABASE_PASSWORD} \
        --project=${PROJECT_ID}
    
    SERVICE_ACCOUNT=$(gcloud sql instances describe ${CLOUD_SQL} --project=${PROJECT_ID} | grep 'serviceAccountEmailAddress' | awk '{print $2;}')
    
    gsutil iam ch serviceAccount:${SERVICE_ACCOUNT}:objectViewer "gs://${GCS_BUCKET}"
    

Create the demonstration schema for migration

In the source Oracle database, create the demoapp schema that will be used for the migration.

  1. Connect to the source Oracle database as the SYS (administrator) user:

    conn / as sysdba
    
  2. Create and populate the schema demoapp:

    create user demoapp;
    grant unlimited tablespace to demoapp;
    create table demoapp.demotable (id number primary key, name varchar2(10));
    insert into demoapp.demotable values (1, 'A');
    insert into demoapp.demotable values (2, 'B');
    commit;
    
  3. From the SQL command line, examine the table demotable:

    select * from demoapp.demotable;
    

    The output should be the following:

             ID NAME
     ---------- ----------
              1 A
              2 B
    

Set up the bastion VM with Oracle Access

The bastion VM is used during the migration process to execute Ora2Pg queries, as well as for executing validations before the cutover to the new database.

  1. From Cloud Shell, connect to the VM with SSH:

    gcloud compute ssh ${BASTION_VM_NAME} \
        --zone ${GCP_ZONE_ID}
        --project ${PROJECT_ID}
    
  2. In the VM shell, install Docker:

    sudo apt-get update -y
    sudo apt-get install -y \
        apt-transport-https \
        ca-certificates \
        curl \
        gnupg-agent \
        software-properties-common
    curl -fsSL https://download.docker.com/linux/debian/gpg | sudo apt-key add -
    sudo add-apt-repository -y \
        "deb [arch=amd64] https://download.docker.com/linux/debian \
        $(lsb_release -cs) \
        stable"
    sudo apt-get update -y
    sudo apt-get install -y docker-ce docker-ce-cli
    sudo usermod -aG docker ${USER}
    
  3. Exit the current VM shell and start a new shell session to pick up the new docker user group.

  4. Set environment variables:

    # Google Cloud project to use for this tutorial
    export PROJECT_ID="[YOUR_PROJECT_ID]"
    
    # Google Cloud region to use for Cloud SQL, Compute Engine, Datastream, and Cloud Storage bucket
    export GCP_REGION_ID="[YOUR_GOOGLE_CLOUD_REGION]"
    
    # Google Cloud zone to use for hosting the bastion Compute Engine instance
    export GCP_ZONE_ID="[YOUR_GOOGLE_CLOUD_ZONE]"
    
    # Name of the Cloud Storage bucket used to host schema conversion output
    export GCS_BUCKET="[YOUR_CLOUD_STORAGE_BUCKET]"
    
    # ID of the Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL instance
    export CLOUD_SQL="[YOUR_CLOUD_SQL_INSTANCE_ID]"
    
    # Version of Ora2Pg (e.g., 21.0)
    export ORA2PG_VERSION="[ORA2PG_VERSION]"
    
    # Version of Oracle Instant Client (e.g., 12.2)
    export ORACLE_ODBC_VERSION="[ORACLE_ODBC_VERSION]"
    
    # Space-separated list of Oracle schemas to export (e.g., "HR OE"). Leave blank to export all schemas.
    export ORACLE_SCHEMAS="[SPACE_SEPARATED_ORACLE_SCHEMA_LIST]"
    
    # Space-separated list of Oracle object types to export (e.g., "TABLE VIEW"). Leave blank to export all object types supported by Ora2Pg.
    export ORACLE_TYPES="[SPACE_SEPARATED_OBJECT_TYPES]"
    
  5. Download Oracle Instant Client packages:

    1. Go to the Oracle Instant Client download page.
    2. Download the RPM packages for your source database version.

      For example, download the following files for Oracle 12c:

      • oracle-instantclient12.2-basiclite-12.2.0.1.0-1.x86_64.rpm
      • oracle-instantclient12.2-devel-12.2.0.1.0-1.x86_64.rpm
      • oracle-instantclient12.2-odbc-12.2.0.1.0-2.x86_64.rpm
    3. Copy the RPM files to community/tutorials/migrate-oracle-postgres-using-datastream/ora2pg/oracle/ on the bastion VM.

  6. Install git and use it to clone the repository:

    sudo apt-get install git -y
    git clone https://github.com/GoogleCloudPlatform/community.git
    
  7. Go to the ora2pg directory:

    cd ~/community/tutorials/migrate-oracle-postgres-using-datastream/ora2pg
    
  8. Build the Ora2Pg Docker image:

    docker build . \
        -f Ora2PGDockerfile \
        -t ora2pg \
        --build-arg ORA2PG_VERSION=${ORA2PG_VERSION} \
        --build-arg ORACLE_ODBC_VERSION=${ORACLE_ODBC_VERSION}
    

Perform schema conversion

The wrapper script ora2pg.sh takes the ORACLE_SCHEMAS and ORACLE_TYPES environment variables as input and runs the ora2pg container to perform the schema export and conversion process. The result is a PostgreSQL-compliant SQL file stored in ora2pg/data/output.sql. This file is then uploaded to the Cloud Storage bucket and imported to the target PostgreSQL instance.

  1. On the bastion VM, edit the community/tutorials/migrate-oracle-postgres-using-datastream/ora2pg/ora2pg/config/ora2pg.conf configuration file to set up database connection details, target PostgreSQL version, and Oracle schema to export.

    Refer to the Ora2Pg documentation for detailed setting descriptions.

    Here is a sample configuration file:

    ####################  Ora2Pg configuration file   #####################
    
    #------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    # INPUT SECTION (Oracle connection or input file)
    #------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    # Set the Oracle home directory
    ORACLE_HOME    /usr/local/oracle/10g
    
    # Set Oracle database connection (datasource, user, password)
    ORACLE_DSN       dbi:Oracle:host=<ORACLE_HOST>;sid=<ORACLE_DATABASE>;port=<ORACLE_PORT>
    ORACLE_USER     <ORACLE_USER>
    ORACLE_PWD      <ORACLE_PASSWORD>
    
    PG_VERSION      <CLOUD_SQL_PG_VERSION>
    
    #------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    # SCHEMA SECTION (Oracle schema to export and use of schema in PostgreSQL)
    #------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    SCHEMA      demoapp
    
    # Export Oracle schema to PostgreSQL schema
    EXPORT_SCHEMA 1
    ROLES 1
    
    # This overrides the owner of the target schema to postgres.
    # Removing this parameter instructs Ora2Pg to alter the owner of the schema to a user of the same name.
    # You need to manually create the owner user in PostgreSQL before import.
    FORCE_OWNER postgres
    
    USE_RESERVED_WORDS 1
    FKEY_DEFERRABLE 1
    
    #------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    # EXPORT SECTION (Export type and filters)
    #------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    TYPE            TABLE
    
    OUTPUT_DIR             /data
    OUTPUT                 output.sql
    FILE_PER_INDEX         0
    FILE_PER_CONSTRAINT    0
    FILE_PER_FKEYS         1
    FILE_PER_TABLE         0
    
  2. Run the ora2pg.sh wrapper script to perform schema export and conversion:

    cd ~/community/tutorials/migrate-oracle-postgres-using-datastream/ora2pg
    
    ./ora2pg.sh
    
  3. (Optional) Examine the schema conversion result stored in ora2pg/data/output.sql:

    less ora2pg/data/output.sql
    
  4. Upload the script to Cloud Storage:

    gsutil cp ora2pg/data/output.sql "gs://${GCS_BUCKET}/resources/ora2pg/output.sql"
    
  5. From Cloud Shell, import the conversion result into the target Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL instance to create the destination schema:

    gcloud sql import sql \
        ${CLOUD_SQL} \
        "gs://${GCS_BUCKET}/resources/ora2pg/output.sql" \
        --user=postgres \
        --project=${PROJECT_ID} \
        --database=postgres \
        --quiet
    

Set up Datastream to capture data from the source Oracle database

Datastream is a serverless change data capture (CDC) and replication service that handles the ingestion and replication of Oracle data into a Cloud Storage bucket. An initial snapshot of the tables is taken (backfilled) and saved in Cloud Storage as Avro-formatted files, time-stamped with the time the table query began. Continuous CDC changes are streamed to Cloud Storage in a similar format. Datastream setup begins with creating connection profiles for the source and destination that specify how to connect.

In this tutorial, a connection profile for the source Oracle database and a connection profile for the destination Cloud Storage bucket are created. A stream is then configured based on the source and destination connection profiles.

Create a connection profile for the source Oracle database

  1. Go to the Datastream connection profiles page.
  2. Click Create profile and select Oracle.
  3. Set the connection details as follows:
    1. Connection profile name: orclsrc
    2. Connection profile ID: orclsrc
    3. Hostname or IP: Hostname or IP address of the source Oracle database
    4. Port: Local listener port address for the source Oracle database
    5. System identifier (SID): SID of the source Oracle database
    6. Username: Username to log in to the source Oracle database
    7. Password: Password to log in to the source Oracle database
  4. Click Show more settings.
  5. For Connection profile region, select a Google Cloud region that is close to the source Oracle database. You use the same region for your stream and destination connection profile.
  6. Click Continue.
  7. For Connectivity method, select the option that corresponds to your network setup.
  8. Click Continue.
  9. Verify that the connection profile is set up correctly by clicking Run test.
  10. Click Create.

Create a connection profile for the Cloud Storage bucket

  1. Go to the Datastream connection profiles page.
  2. Click Create profile and select Cloud Storage.
  3. Set the connection details as follows:
    1. Connection profile name: ora2pggcs
    2. Connection profile ID: ora2pggcs
    3. Bucket name: [GCS_BUCKET]
    4. Connection profile path prefix: /ora2pg
  4. Click Show more settings.
  5. For Connection profile region, select the same Google Cloud region that you chose for your source connection profile.
  6. Click Create.

Create a stream to capture data from the source database for the data migration

A stream in Datastream consists of configured source and destination connection profiles, as well as a definition of the scope of source data to be streamed.

Create a new stream to capture data from the source Oracle database:

  1. Go to the Datastream Streams page.
  2. Create Create stream.
  3. Set the stream details as follows:
    1. Stream name: ora2pgstream
    2. Stream ID: ora2pgstream
    3. Region: Select the same Google Cloud region that you chose for your source connection profile.
    4. Source type: Oracle
    5. Destination type: Cloud Storage
  4. Review the prerequisites and apply changes to the source database as needed.
  5. Click Continue.
  6. For Source connection profile, select orclsrc.
  7. Click Continue.
  8. Fill out the stream source details as follows:
    1. Objects to include: Custom manual definition
    2. Object matching criteria: Enter the Oracle schema to export followed by .*. For this tutorial, enter DEMOAPP.*.
    3. Objects to exclude: Leave this field empty.
    4. Backfill mode for historical data: Automatic
  9. Click Continue.
  10. For Destination connection profile, select ora2pggcs.
  11. Click Continue.
  12. Keep everything default on the Configure stream destination page, and click Continue.
  13. Click Run validation to ensure that the stream is set up correctly.
  14. Click Create & start to complete setup and start the Datastream job.

Set up a Dataflow job to replicate data from Cloud Storage into the target PostgreSQL database

A Dataflow Flex Template reads the Avro-formatted files output by the Datastream stream as they are written and applies them to the target PostgreSQL database.

Deploy this Dataflow job by running the following commands in Cloud Shell:

export NEW_UUID=$(cat /proc/sys/kernel/random/uuid)
export DATAFLOW_JOB_PREFIX=ora2pg
export DATAFLOW_JOB_NAME="${DATAFLOW_JOB_PREFIX}-${NEW_UUID}"
export DATABASE_HOST=$(gcloud sql instances list --project=${PROJECT_ID} | grep "${CLOUD_SQL}" | awk '{print $6;}')
export GCS_STREAM_PATH="gs://${GCS_BUCKET}/ora2pg/"
export DATABASE_PASSWORD="<TARGET_PG_DATABASE_PASSWORD>"

gcloud beta dataflow flex-template run "${DATAFLOW_JOB_NAME}" \
    --project="${PROJECT_ID}" --region="${GCP_REGION_ID}" \
    --template-file-gcs-location="gs://dataflow-templates/latest/flex/Cloud_Datastream_to_Postgres" \
    --parameters inputFilePattern="${GCS_STREAM_PATH}",\
        gcsPubSubSubscription="projects/${PROJECT_ID}/subscriptions/${PUBSUB_TOPIC}-subscription",\
        databaseHost=${DATABASE_HOST},\
        databasePort="5432",\
        databaseUser="postgres",\
        databasePassword="${DATABASE_PASSWORD}",\
        maxNumWorkers=10,\
        autoscalingAlgorithm="THROUGHPUT_BASED"

Verify that the data replication is working

When the Dataflow job is up and running, verify that data is replicated correctly from the source Oracle database to the target Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL database:

  1. Connect to the target Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL database:

    gcloud sql connect ${CLOUD_SQL} --user=postgres --quiet
    
  2. Query the table:

    postgres=> select * from demoapp.demotable;
    

    The output should look like the following, though the values in the rowid column may differ:

           rowid    | id | name 
        ------------+----+------
         1343264979 |  1 | A
         1345112114 |  2 | B
        (2 rows)
    
  3. Connect to the source Oracle database and make some changes with the following SQL statements:

    insert into demoapp.demotable values (3, 'C');
    update demoapp.demotable set name = 'Z' where id = 1;
    delete from demoapp.demotable where id = 2;
    commit;
    
  4. Examine the updated table on the Oracle side:

    select * from demoapp.demotable;
    

    The output should look like the following:

            ID NAME
    ---------- ----------
             1 Z
             3 C
    
  5. Force a redo log switch:

    alter system switch logfile;
    
  6. Go back to the target Cloud SQL for PostgreSQL database and verify that the changes have been replicated:

    postgres=> select * from demoapp.demotable;
    

    The output should look similar to this:

            rowid    | id | name 
         ------------+----+------
          1345112276 |  3 | C
          1343264979 |  1 | Z
         (2 rows)
    

Data validation before cutover

In this section, you use an open source data validation toolkit to validate row numbers and aggregated column metrics.

  1. Build the data validation Docker image:

    # Version of Oracle Instant Client Version (e.g., 12.2)
    export ORACLE_ODBC_VERSION="[ORACLE_ODBC_VERSION]"
    
    cd ~/community/tutorials/migrate-oracle-postgres-using-datastream/ora2pg
    docker build . \
        -f DataValidationDockerfile \
        -t data-validation \
        --build-arg ORACLE_ODBC_VERSION=${ORACLE_ODBC_VERSION}
    
  2. Set up database connection profiles:

    docker run -v $(pwd)/data_validation:/config data-validation connections add -c oracle Raw --json "{\"host\":\"${ORACLE_HOST}\",\"user\":\"${ORACLE_USER}\",\"password\":\"${ORACLE_PASSWORD}\",\"source_type\":\"Oracle\",\"database\":\"${ORACLE_DATABASE}\"}"
    
    docker run -v $(pwd)/data_validation:/config data-validation connections add -c postgres Raw --json "{\"host\":\"${DATABASE_HOST}\",\"user\":\"${DATABASE_USER}\",\"password\":\"${DATABASE_PASSWORD}\",\"source_type\":\"Postgres\",\"database\":\"postgres\"}"
    
  3. Discover the list of tables to compare:

    TABLES_LIST=$(docker run -v $(pwd)/data_validation:/config data-validation find-tables --source-conn oracle --target-conn postgres)
    echo ${TABLE_LIST}
    

    The output should be a JSON object containing schema and table name tuples. For example:

    [{"schema_name": "demoapp", "table_name": "demotable", "target_schema_name": "demoapp", "target_table_name": "demotable"}]
    
  4. Perform data validation:

    docker run -v $(pwd)/data_validation:/config data-validation run --source-conn oracle --target-conn postgres --tables-list "${TABLES_LIST}" --type Column
    

    The data validator counts the number of rows in each table from the source database and the target database and report any changes as a list of tables and their comparison results. For example:

    validation_name validation_type aggregation_type source_table_name source_column_name source_agg_value target_table_name target_column_name target_agg_value group_by_columns  difference  pct_difference                               run_id labels                       start_time                         end_time
              count          Column            count demoapp.demotable               None                5 demoapp.demotable               None                5             None         0.0             0.0 86e35cc7-113f-4559-95c9-683e708b4ab8     [] 2021-04-07 06:55:31.246836+00:00 2021-04-07 06:55:31.246846+00:00
    

    The data validator also supports other types of validation. For details, see the Data Validation Tool GitHub page.

Cleaning up

To avoid incurring charges to your Google Cloud account for the resources used in this tutorial, you can delete the project:

  1. In the Cloud Console, go to the Manage resources page.
  2. In the project list, select the project that you want to delete and then click Delete.
  3. In the dialog, type the project ID and then click Shut down to delete the project.

What's next

Learn about migrating an Oracle database to Cloud SQL PostgreSQL with the following series:

Submit a tutorial

Share step-by-step guides

Submit a tutorial

Request a tutorial

Ask for community help

Submit a request

View tutorials

Search Google Cloud tutorials

View tutorials

Except as otherwise noted, the content of this page is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License, and code samples are licensed under the Apache 2.0 License. For details, see our Site Policies. Java is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates.