Create and manage virtual disks in Anthos clusters on bare metal

This document is intended for application owners that run Anthos clusters on bare metal. This document shows you how to create and manage disk resources for virtual machines (VMs) that use Anthos VM Runtime.

Before you begin

To complete this document, you need access to the following resources:

Create a VM with an attached disk

When you create a VM, you can attach an existing boot or data disk, create a disk from an image (including for the boot disk), or create a blank disk.

Blank disk

In this scenario, you create a blank disk and attach it to the VM. This scenario lets you create a data disk to store application data.

  1. Create a manifest that defines a VirtualMachineDisk and VirtualMachine, such as my-vm.yaml, in the editor of your choice:

    nano my-vm.yaml
    
  2. Copy and paste the following YAML definition:

    apiVersion: vm.cluster.gke.io/v1
    kind: VirtualMachineDisk
    metadata:
      name: DISK_NAME
    spec:
      size: 10GiB
    ---
    apiVersion: vm.cluster.gke.io/v1
    kind: VirtualMachine
    metadata:
      name: VM_NAME
    spec:
      interfaces:
        - name: eth0
          networkName: pod-network
          default: true
      disks:
        - boot: true
          virtualMachineDiskName: VM_NAME-boot-dv
        - virtualMachineDiskName: DISK_NAME
    

    This example creates a blank 10GiB disk named DISK_NAME. In the VM's spec.disks section, you must also attach a boot disk, such as from an image as shown in the next section.

  3. Save and close the manifest file in your editor.

  4. Create the VM and disk using kubectl:

    kubectl apply -f my-vm.yaml
    

From image

In this scenario, you create a disk from an image and attach it to the VM. This scenario lets you create a boot disk, for example, from an image. You can also create and attach data disks from an image.

  1. Create a manifest that defines a VirtualMachineDisk and VirtualMachine, such as my-vm.yaml, in the editor of your choice:

    nano my-vm.yaml
    
  2. Copy and paste the following YAML definition:

    apiVersion: vm.cluster.gke.io/v1
    kind: VirtualMachineDisk
    metadata:
      name: VM_NAME-boot-dv
    spec:
      size: 20GiB
      source:
        http:
          url: https://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/focal/release/ubuntu-20.04-server-cloudimg-amd64.img
    ---
    apiVersion: vm.cluster.gke.io/v1
    kind: VirtualMachine
    metadata:
      name: VM_NAME
    spec:
      interfaces:
        - name: eth0
          networkName: pod-network
          default: true
      disks:
        - boot: true
          virtualMachineDiskName: VM_NAME-boot-dv
    

    This example creates a 20GiB disk named VM_NAME-boot-dv using a public Ubuntu image. In the VM's spec.disks section, the disk is set to boot: true.

  3. Save and close the manifest in your editor.

  4. Create the VM and disk using kubectl:

    kubectl apply -f my-vm.yaml
    

Existing disk

In this scenario, you create a blank disk and attach it to the VM. This scenario lets you create a data disk to store application data.

  1. Create a VirtualMachine manifest, such as my-vm.yaml, in the editor of your choice:

    nano my-vm.yaml
    
  2. Copy and paste the following YAML definition:

    apiVersion: vm.cluster.gke.io/v1
    kind: VirtualMachine
    metadata:
      name: VM_NAME
    spec:
      interfaces:
        - name: eth0
          networkName: pod-network
          default: true
      disks:
        - boot: true
          virtualMachineDiskName: VM_NAME-boot-dv
        - virtualMachineDiskName: EXISTING_DISK_NAME
    

    This example attaches an existing disk named EXISTING_DISK_NAME.

    In the VM's spec.disks section, you must also attach a boot disk, such as from an image as shown in the preceding section.

  3. Save and close the VM manifest in your editor.

  4. Create the VM using kubectl:

    kubectl apply -f my-vm.yaml
    

Create and attach disks to existing VM

If you have an existing VM, you can create and attach disks to support your application lifecycles. The VM must be in a stopped state before you attach a disk.

Blank disk

In this scenario, you create a blank disk and attach it to the VM. This scenario lets you create a data disk to store application data.

  1. Use kubectl to stop the VM, if needed:

    kubectl virt stop vm VM_NAME
    

    Replace VM_NAME with the name of the VM that you want to stop.

  2. Edit your existing VM resource, such as my-vm:

    kubectl edit gvm VM_NAME
    
  3. Update the VirtualMachine YAML manifest to add a VirtualMachineDisk section at the top, and then attach the disk at the end of the VM's spec.disks section:

    apiVersion: vm.cluster.gke.io/v1
    kind: VirtualMachineDisk
    metadata:
      name: DISK_NAME
    spec:
      size: 10GiB
    ---
    apiVersion: vm.cluster.gke.io/v1
    kind: VirtualMachine
    metadata:
      name: VM_NAME
    spec:
      interfaces:
        - name: eth0
          networkName: pod-network
          default: true
      disks:
        - boot: true
          virtualMachineDiskName: VM_NAME-boot-dv
        - virtualMachineDiskName: DISK_NAME
    

    This example creates a blank 10GiB disk named DISK_NAME.

  4. Save and close the updated VM manifest in your editor.

  5. Use kubectl to start the VM:

    kubectl virt start vm VM_NAME
    

    Replace VM_NAME with the name of the VM that you want to start.

From image

In this scenario, you create a disk from a source image and attach it to the VM.

  1. Use kubectl to stop the VM, if needed:

    kubectl virt stop vm VM_NAME
    

    Replace VM_NAME with the name of the VM that you want to stop.

  2. Edit your existing VM resource, such as my-vm:

    kubectl edit gvm VM_NAME
    
  3. Update the VirtualMachine manifest to add a VirtualMachineDisk section at the top, and then attach the disk at the end of the VM's spec.disks section:

    apiVersion: vm.cluster.gke.io/v1
    kind: VirtualMachineDisk
    metadata:
      name: DISK_NAME
    spec:
      size: 10GiB
      source:
        http:
          url: http://example.com/my-disk-img.qcow2
    ---
    apiVersion: vm.cluster.gke.io/v1
    kind: VirtualMachine
    metadata:
      name: VM_NAME
    spec:
      interfaces:
        - name: eth0
          networkName: pod-network
          default: true
      disks:
        - boot: true
          virtualMachineDiskName: VM_NAME-boot-dv
        - virtualMachineDiskName: DISK_NAME
    

    This example creates a 10GiB disk named DISK_NAME from the http://example.com/my-disk-img.qcow2 HTTP source.

  4. Save and close the updated VM manifest in your editor.

  5. Use kubectl to start the VM:

    kubectl virt start vm VM_NAME
    

    Replace VM_NAME with the name of the VM that you want to start.

Create a disk

In this scenario, you create the disk resources separately from the VM resources. This scenario lets you create disks ahead of time, and then attach to VMs as needed.

Blank disk

To create a blank disk, complete the following steps.

  1. Create a VirtualMachineDisk manifest, such as my-disk.yaml, in the editor of your choice:

    nano my-disk.yaml
    
  2. Copy and paste the following YAML definition:

    apiVersion: vm.cluster.gke.io/v1
    kind: VirtualMachineDisk
    metadata:
      name: DISK_NAME
    spec:
      size: 10GiB
    

    This example creates a blank 10GiB disk named DISK_NAME.

  3. Save and close the disk manifest in your editor.

  4. Create the disk using kubectl:

    kubectl apply -f my-disk.yaml
    

From image

To create a disk from an image, complete the following steps.

  1. Create a VirtualMachineDisk manifest, such as my-disk.yaml, in the editor of your choice:

    nano my-disk.yaml
    
  2. Copy and paste the following YAML definition:

    apiVersion: vm.cluster.gke.io/v1
    kind: VirtualMachineDisk
    metadata:
      name: DISK_NAME
    spec:
      size: 20GiB
      source:
        http:
          url: https://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/focal/release/ubuntu-20.04-server-cloudimg-amd64.img
    

    This example creates a 20GiB disk named DISK_NAME using a public Ubuntu image.

  3. Save and close the disk manifest in your editor.

  4. Create the disk using kubectl:

    kubectl apply -f my-disk.yaml
    

What's next