Insert using mutate

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Insert rows using mutate.

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For detailed documentation that includes this code sample, see the following:

Code sample

C#

To learn how to install and use the client library for Bigtable, see Bigtable client libraries.

// Initialize Google.Cloud.Bigtable.V2.TableName object.
Google.Cloud.Bigtable.Common.V2.TableName tableName = new Google.Cloud.Bigtable.Common.V2.TableName(projectId, instanceId, tableId);

// Write some rows
/* Each row has a unique row key.

       Note: This example uses sequential numeric IDs for simplicity, but
       this can result in poor performance in a production application.
       Since rows are stored in sorted order by key, sequential keys can
       result in poor distribution of operations across nodes.

       For more information about how to design a Bigtable schema for the
       best performance, see the documentation:

       https://cloud.google.com/bigtable/docs/schema-design */

Console.WriteLine($"Write some greetings to the table {tableId}");

// Insert 1 row using MutateRow()
s_greetingIndex = 0;
try
{
    bigtableClient.MutateRow(tableName, rowKeyPrefix + s_greetingIndex, MutationBuilder());
    Console.WriteLine($"\tGreeting:   -- {s_greetings[s_greetingIndex],-18}-- written successfully");
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine($"\tFailed to write greeting: --{s_greetings[s_greetingIndex]}");
    Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
    throw;
}

// Insert multiple rows using MutateRows()
// Build a MutateRowsRequest (contains table name and a collection of entries).
MutateRowsRequest request = new MutateRowsRequest
{
    TableNameAsTableName = tableName
};

s_mapToOriginalGreetingIndex = new List<int>();
while (++s_greetingIndex < s_greetings.Length)
{
    s_mapToOriginalGreetingIndex.Add(s_greetingIndex);
    // Build an entry for every greeting (consists of rowkey and a collection of mutations).
    string rowKey = rowKeyPrefix + s_greetingIndex;
    request.Entries.Add(Mutations.CreateEntry(rowKey, MutationBuilder()));
}

// Make the request to write multiple rows.
MutateRowsResponse response = bigtableClient.MutateRows(request);

// Check the status code of each entry to ensure that it was written successfully.
foreach (MutateRowsResponse.Types.Entry entry in response.Entries)
{
    s_greetingIndex = s_mapToOriginalGreetingIndex[(int)entry.Index];
    if (entry.Status.Code == 0)
    {
        Console.WriteLine($"\tGreeting:   -- {s_greetings[s_greetingIndex],-18}-- written successfully");
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine($"\tFailed to write greeting: --{s_greetings[s_greetingIndex]}");
        Console.WriteLine(entry.Status.Message);
    }
}

Mutation MutationBuilder() =>
    Mutations.SetCell(columnFamily, columnName, s_greetings[s_greetingIndex], new BigtableVersion(DateTime.UtcNow));

C++

To learn how to install and use the client library for Bigtable, see Bigtable client libraries.

std::vector<std::string> greetings{"Hello World!", "Hello Cloud Bigtable!",
                                   "Hello C++!"};
int i = 0;
for (auto const& greeting : greetings) {
  // Each row has a unique row key.
  //
  // Note: This example uses sequential numeric IDs for simplicity, but
  // this can result in poor performance in a production application.
  // Since rows are stored in sorted order by key, sequential keys can
  // result in poor distribution of operations across nodes.
  //
  // For more information about how to design a Bigtable schema for the
  // best performance, see the documentation:
  //
  //     https://cloud.google.com/bigtable/docs/schema-design
  std::string row_key = "key-" + std::to_string(i);
  google::cloud::Status status = table.Apply(cbt::SingleRowMutation(
      std::move(row_key), cbt::SetCell("family", "c0", greeting)));

  if (!status.ok()) throw std::runtime_error(status.message());
  ++i;
}

Go

To learn how to install and use the client library for Bigtable, see Bigtable client libraries.

tbl := client.Open(tableName)
muts := make([]*bigtable.Mutation, len(greetings))
rowKeys := make([]string, len(greetings))

log.Printf("Writing greeting rows to table")
for i, greeting := range greetings {
	muts[i] = bigtable.NewMutation()
	muts[i].Set(columnFamilyName, columnName, bigtable.Now(), []byte(greeting))

	// Each row has a unique row key.
	//
	// Note: This example uses sequential numeric IDs for simplicity, but
	// this can result in poor performance in a production application.
	// Since rows are stored in sorted order by key, sequential keys can
	// result in poor distribution of operations across nodes.
	//
	// For more information about how to design a Bigtable schema for the
	// best performance, see the documentation:
	//
	//     https://cloud.google.com/bigtable/docs/schema-design
	rowKeys[i] = fmt.Sprintf("%s%d", columnName, i)
}

rowErrs, err := tbl.ApplyBulk(ctx, rowKeys, muts)
if err != nil {
	log.Fatalf("Could not apply bulk row mutation: %v", err)
}
if rowErrs != nil {
	for _, rowErr := range rowErrs {
		log.Printf("Error writing row: %v", rowErr)
	}
	log.Fatalf("Could not write some rows")
}

Java

To learn how to install and use the client library for Bigtable, see Bigtable client libraries.

try {
  System.out.println("\nWriting some greetings to the table");
  String[] names = {"World", "Bigtable", "Java"};
  for (int i = 0; i < names.length; i++) {
    String greeting = "Hello " + names[i] + "!";
    RowMutation rowMutation =
        RowMutation.create(tableId, ROW_KEY_PREFIX + i)
            .setCell(COLUMN_FAMILY, COLUMN_QUALIFIER_NAME, names[i])
            .setCell(COLUMN_FAMILY, COLUMN_QUALIFIER_GREETING, greeting);
    dataClient.mutateRow(rowMutation);
    System.out.println(greeting);
  }
} catch (NotFoundException e) {
  System.err.println("Failed to write to non-existent table: " + e.getMessage());
}

Node.js

To learn how to install and use the client library for Bigtable, see Bigtable client libraries.

console.log('Write some greetings to the table');
const greetings = ['Hello World!', 'Hello Bigtable!', 'Hello Node!'];
const rowsToInsert = greetings.map((greeting, index) => ({
  // Note: This example uses sequential numeric IDs for simplicity, but this
  // pattern can result in poor performance in a production application.
  // Rows are stored in sorted order by key, so sequential keys can result
  // in poor distribution of operations across nodes.
  //
  // For more information about how to design an effective schema for Cloud
  // Bigtable, see the documentation:
  // https://cloud.google.com/bigtable/docs/schema-design
  key: `greeting${index}`,
  data: {
    [COLUMN_FAMILY_ID]: {
      [COLUMN_QUALIFIER]: {
        // Setting the timestamp allows the client to perform retries. If
        // server-side time is used, retries may cause multiple cells to
        // be generated.
        timestamp: new Date(),
        value: greeting,
      },
    },
  },
}));
await table.insert(rowsToInsert);

PHP

To learn how to install and use the client library for Bigtable, see Bigtable client libraries.

$table = $dataClient->table($instanceId, $tableId);

printf('Writing some greetings to the table.' . PHP_EOL);
$greetings = ['Hello World!', 'Hello Cloud Bigtable!', 'Hello PHP!'];
$entries = [];
$columnFamilyId = 'cf1';
$column = 'greeting';
foreach ($greetings as $i => $value) {
    $rowKey = sprintf('greeting%s', $i);
    $rowMutation = new Mutations();
    $rowMutation->upsert($columnFamilyId, $column, $value, time() * 1000 * 1000);
    $entries[$rowKey] = $rowMutation;
}
$table->mutateRows($entries);

Python

To learn how to install and use the client library for Bigtable, see Bigtable client libraries.

print("Writing some greetings to the table.")
greetings = ["Hello World!", "Hello Cloud Bigtable!", "Hello Python!"]
rows = []
column = "greeting".encode()
for i, value in enumerate(greetings):
    # Note: This example uses sequential numeric IDs for simplicity,
    # but this can result in poor performance in a production
    # application.  Since rows are stored in sorted order by key,
    # sequential keys can result in poor distribution of operations
    # across nodes.
    #
    # For more information about how to design a Bigtable schema for
    # the best performance, see the documentation:
    #
    #     https://cloud.google.com/bigtable/docs/schema-design
    row_key = "greeting{}".format(i).encode()
    row = table.direct_row(row_key)
    row.set_cell(
        column_family_id, column, value, timestamp=datetime.datetime.utcnow()
    )
    rows.append(row)
table.mutate_rows(rows)

Ruby

To learn how to install and use the client library for Bigtable, see Bigtable client libraries.

puts "Write some greetings to the table #{table_id}"
greetings = ["Hello World!", "Hello Bigtable!", "Hello Ruby!"]

# Insert rows one by one
# Note: To perform multiple mutation on multiple rows use `mutate_rows`.
greetings.each_with_index do |value, i|
  puts " Writing,  Row key: greeting#{i}, Value: #{value}"

  entry = table.new_mutation_entry "greeting#{i}"
  entry.set_cell(
    column_family,
    column_qualifier,
    value,
    timestamp: (Time.now.to_f * 1_000_000).round(-3)
  )

  table.mutate_row entry
end

What's next

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