Google Workspace and Cloud Identity

Google Workspace and Cloud Identity

HIPAA Implementation Guide
June 2020

Google works to keep users' data secure in the cloud in a reliable, compliant way.

The combination of security and privacy lead to a strong ecosystem that keeps your information safe. For customers who are subject to the requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (known as HIPAA, as amended, including by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health — HITECH — Act), Google Workspace supports HIPAA compliance.

This guide is intended for security officers, compliance officers, IT administrators, and other employees in organizations who are responsible for HIPAA implementation and compliance with Google Workspace and Google Cloud Identity. Under HIPAA, certain information about a person’s health or health care services is classified as Protected Health Information (PHI). After reading this guide, you will understand how to organize your data on Google services when handling PHI to help meet your compliance needs.

Customer responsibilities

Customers are responsible for determining if they are a Business Associate (and whether a HIPAA Business Associate Agreement with Google is required) and for ensuring that they use Google services in compliance with HIPAA. Customers are responsible for fulfilling an individual's right of access, amendment, and accounting in accordance with the requirements under HIPAA.

Using Google services with PHI

Google Workspace customers who are subject to HIPAA and wish to use Google Workspace with PHI must sign a Business Associate Addendum (BAA) to their Google Workspace Agreement with Google. Google Cloud Identity customers who are subject to HIPAA and wish to use the services with PHI must sign a BAA to their Cloud Identity Agreement with Google. Per the Google Workspace and Cloud Identity BAA, PHI is allowed only in a subset of Google services. These Google covered services, which are “Included Functionality” under the HIPAA BAA, must be configured by IT administrators to help ensure that PHI is properly protected. In order to understand how the Included Functionality can be used in conjunction with PHI, we’ve divided the Google Workspace Core Services (“Core Services”) and Cloud Identity services covered by your respective Agreements into three categories. Administrators can limit which services are available to different groups of end users, depending on whether particular end users will use services with PHI.

  • HIPAA Included Functionality: All users can access this subset of Core Services for use with PHI under the BAA as long as the health care organization configures those services to be HIPAA compliant:

    Gmail, Calendar, Drive (including Docs, Sheets, Slides, and Forms), Hangouts classic (chat messaging feature only), Google Chat, Google Meet, Keep, Google Cloud Search, Google Voice (managed users only), Sites, Google Groups, Jamboard, Cloud Identity Management, Tasks, and Vault (find full list of Google Workspace Core Services).

  • Core Services where PHI is not permitted: Any Core Service not listed in section 1 may not be used in connection with PHI.

    Google Workspace administrators can choose to turn on these remaining Core Services, which may include Contacts, and Currents , for its users, but it is their responsibility to not store or manage PHI in those services. It is possible that the list of Core Services may be updated from time to time. Any updates to such functionality should be considered by default to be included in this category unless expressly added to the definition of Included Functionality. Please see “Separating user access within your domain” for further details on how to utilize organizational units to manage user access to services that are appropriate for PHI.

  • Other Non-Core Services offered by Google: PHI is not permitted in other Non-Core Services offered by Google where Google has not made a separate HIPAA BAA available for use of such service.

    All other Non-Core Services not covered by your Google Workspace Agreement, including, for example, (without limitation) YouTube, Blogger and Google Photos (see list of additional Google Services), must be disabled for Google Workspace users who manage PHI within the Included Functionality - unless covered by a separate BAA. Only users who do not use Included Functionality to manage PHI may use those separate Non-Core Services offered by Google (under the separate terms applicable to these Google services). Please see “Separating user access within your domain” for further details on how to utilize organizational units to restrict access to services that are not HIPAA compliant.

  • Technical Support Services:

    Technical support services provided to Customer by Google are not part of the HIPAA Included Functionality. Customers should not provide PHI to Google when accessing technical support services.

Core Services in which PHI is permitted Core Services in which PHI is NOT permitted
  • -Gmail
  • -Calendar
  • -Drive (including Docs, Sheets, Slides, and Forms)
  • -Tasks
  • -Keep
  • -Sites
  • -Jamboard
  • -Hangouts classic (chat messaging feature only)
  • -Chat
  • -Meet
  • -Google Cloud Search
  • -Google Groups
  • -Google Voice (managed users only
  • -Cloud Identity Management
  • -Vault (if applicable)
  • -Google Contacts
  • -Currents

To manage end user access to different sets of Google services, Google Workspace administrators can create organizational units to put end users who manage PHI and end users who do not into separate groups. Once these units are set up, an administrator can turn specific services on or off for groups of users. Those who manage PHI, for instance, should have non-Core Services turned off. Please see “Separating user access within your domain” in the “Additional considerations for HIPAA compliance” section below for further details on how to utilize organizational units.

To learn more about how Google secures your data, please review our Trust and security page.

What to consider for specific Google Workspace Core Services

Every Google Workspace Core Service has specific settings to adjust to help ensure that data is secure, used, and accessed only in accordance with your requirements. Here are some actionable recommendations to help you address specific concerns within services that are HIPAA Included Functionality:

Monitoring account activity

The Admin console reports and logs make it easy to examine potential security risks, measure user collaboration, track who signs in and when, analyze administrator activity, and much more. To monitor logs and alerts, admins can configure notifications to send them alerts when Google detects these activities: suspicious login attempts, user suspended by an administrator, new user added, suspended user made active, user deleted, user's password changed by an administrator, user granted admin privilege, and user's admin privilege revoked. The admin can also review reports and logs on a regular basis to examine potential security risks. The main things to focus on are key trends in the highlights section, overall exposure to data breach in security, files created in apps usage activity, account activity, and audits.

Search history

It is recommended to turn off search history for services where the search history may be accessed beyond the individual account.

Gmail

Gmail provides controls to help users ensure that messages and attachments are only shared with the intended recipients. When composing emails and inserting files using Google Drive that may contain PHI, end users can choose to share only with the intended recipients. If the file is not already shared with all email recipients, the default will be to share the file with “Anyone with the link” within the Google Workspace domain. Change the link sharing settings to “Private.” Administrators can also create DLP policies that inspect emails for evidence of certain PII/PHI identifiers and apply policy on how that data is shared.

Please refer to the Use of third party applications for guidance on using third party applications with Gmail.

If Gmail is used to email groups of individuals or mailing lists, it's advised to use the “Bcc:” field instead of the “To:” field so recipients of the email are hidden from each other. Additionally, recipients in the “Bcc” field are not copied in subsequent “Reply” and “Reply All” threads.

Calendar

Within your domain, employees can change if and how their calendar is shared. Admins can set sharing options for all calendars created in the domain. By default, all calendars share all information to anyone within your domain, and only free/busy information with all external parties. To limit exposure of PHI within the domain, employees should consider setting calendar entries to “Private” for calendar entries that contain PHI. Calendar provides a feature that can add a link to a Meet video meeting to the Calendar entry. Please see details below regarding use of Meet for video meetings.

Admins should consider setting external sharing settings to “Only free/busy information" for the domain when PHI is handled. Admins should consider setting internal calendar sharing options to “No sharing” or “Only free/busy information” for employees who handle PHI.

Drive (including Docs, Sheets, Slides, and Forms)

Employees can choose how visible files and folders are, as well as the editing and sharing capabilities of collaborators, when sharing files in Google Drive (including Docs, Sheets, Slides, and Forms). When creating and sharing files in Google Drive (including Docs, Sheets, Slides, and Forms) it is recommended that users avoid putting PHI in titles of such files, folders, or Team Drives (Image A).

Admins can set file sharing permissions to the appropriate visibility level for the google workspace account. Admins can “Restrict” or “Allow” employees to share documents outside the domain, and set the default file visibility to “Private” (Image B).

In addition, admins can also restrict sharing for content within individual Team Drives or even set defaults for all newly created Team Drives in an organization. These restrictions can help limit whether Team Drives may have external users as members, or whether or not members can download, copy and print any of the files in the Team Drive. For more on Team Drives, see this article. To learn more about managing sharing within Team Drives, see this article.

The file exposure reports within security center for Google Workspace give admins information on how employees are sharing files. For example, the report can show which files are shared with external domain users. Admins should consider periodically running these reports for employees who manage PHI to ensure PHI is not inadvertently shared.

Admins should consider disabling third party applications that can be installed, such as apps using the Google Drive SDK API and Google Docs add-ons. Admins should review the security of these applications, as well as any corresponding security documentation provided by the third party developer.

Apps Script

See the Drive section above for guidelines regarding how and with whom to share Apps Script projects. It is recommended that projects that access PHI should be accessible only by users who are permitted to access the PHI.

When using Apps Script to generate emails or other messages, to update Docs, Sheets or other documents, or to send data to another application, ensure that PHI is included only if all recipients or users with access to the target file or system are authorized to access it.

When using ScriptProperties, DocumentProperties or any other shared data store, do not store PHI unless your Apps Script project and any deployments are accessible only to users who are allowed to access the stored PHI.

When using the JDBC or UrlFetchApp service, do not insert PHI into an external database or upload it to an external web service unless the database or web service is only accessible to users who are authorized to access PHI. Do not use JDBC or UrlFetchApp to insert or upload PHI to Google Cloud Platform services and APIs, and do not use the console.* functions to log PHI to Cloud Logging, without signing a BAA with Google Cloud Platform.

When using Apps Script it is recommended that access is limited to the minimum necessary to ensure that the code prevents unauthorized access to PHI. Below are some recommended configuration settings for particular use cases.

When deploying an Apps Script project that handles PHI as a web app, under “Execute the app as,” it is recommended to select “User accessing the web app.”

If the web app needs to execute as you, under “Who has access to the app,” select “Only myself.” If the web app needs to execute as you and other users need to have access, select “Anyone within [your domain]” and ensure that your code blocks any user who should not have access to PHI (Image A).

When deploying an Apps Script project as an API executable, under “Who has access to the script,” select “Only myself.” Or, if other users need to have access, select “Anyone within [your domain” and ensure that your code blocks any user who should not have access to PHI (Image B).

Keep

Within your domain, employees can use Keep to take notes and create lists containing PHI. In Drive sharing settings, Admins can set file sharing permissions to the appropriate visibility level for Google Workspace account. Admins can “Restrict” or “Allow” employees to share the documents outside the domain, and set the default file visibility to “Private” (Image A).

The sharing settings for notes created in Google Keep are a sub-set of Drive sharing settings, however all Keep notes created by employees have a default visibility set to “Private” regardless of the Drive settings.

Keep does not support a concept of “Public” notes, or notes visible to those with the URL. Instead, employees can choose to add collaborators to individual Keep notes via individual email addresses or group aliases (Image B). All collaborators added to a note have full access to view and edit the contents of a note (e.g. content in the title, body and list of the note, in addition to any attached images, drawings, or audio).

Employees can color, label, add reminders, and archive their notes, however these note attributes are per user, and are not shared with other note collaborators. The original owner of a note has the option to Trash the note, which will trash the note for all collaborators as well. Collaborators on a note are not able to Trash the note, however they can choose to unsubscribe from the note if they choose.

Sites

The Sites service (both classic and new versions), like all Google Workspace Core Services, does not serve advertising or use customer data for advertising purposes. However, some users of AdSense may use the separate AdSense product to display advertising on their Sites pages. Users should ensure that AdSense is not included whenever Sites is used with PHI.

For sites containing PHI, employees should configure the Sites sharing and visibility settings appropriately. PHI can be included in a site in the form of text, images, or other content (such as a Google Calendar or content stored in Google Drive (including Docs, Sheets, Slides, and Forms). Instructions to configure these settings are outlined below separately for each version of Sites (classic and new):

Sites (classic version)

For sites containing PHI, employees can set the sharing settings for sites created in classic Sites to control who can edit or view their sites. Employees can also turn on page-level permissions to granularly control who has access to individual web pages within a site.

Admins should consider setting the default visibility for sites to “Private”.

Sites (new version)

The new version of Sites relies on a combination of Sites and Drive settings. Admins can allow (or disallow) employees to create and edit sites using new Sites, using a control for this purpose located under the Sites icon in the Admin console. Admins control the level of sharing and visibility allowed for sites created in new Sites using the sharing settings for Drive in the Admin console.

For sites containing PHI, employees should consider giving limited editing access to specific individuals. Employees should also consider not publishing their site to outside their domain.

Jamboard

Jamboard is the hardware device built for collaborative whiteboarding. The software application running on the kiosk, tablets and phone is also called Jamboard. Documents hosted on any of the above devices are called Jams.

Administrators can configure settings for Jamboard within the Admin console. The Jamboard app has a service on/off switch in the Admin console, shown below. This is where an admin can turn off the service if they wish to.

For more information, please refer to Turn on the Jamboard service for your users support article.

Only the active Jam session is also stored locally on a Jamboard device. Once a new Jam has been started the previous Jam document will be deleted from the device.

Sharing settings

In Drive sharing settings, Admins can set file sharing permissions to the appropriate visibility level for the Google Workspace account. Admins can “Restrict” or “Allow” employees to share documents outside the domain, and set the default file visibility to “Private.” The sharing settings for Jam files are a sub-set of Drive sharing settings.

For more information on how to use the Jamboard to create, host, and edit Jams, refer to Working in a live Jam session support article.

Jam files created on a board will initially be owned by the board account. Once a user claims a file from the board, ownership will be transferred to the user, and the board will appear in the “Who has access” list as a collaborator (see image above for reference). Only users within the same domain as the board can claim Jam files from the board.

The original owner of a Jam file has the option to trash the Jam, which will trash the Jam for all collaborators as well. Collaborators on a Jam file can trash the file, which will only remove the Jam file from their Jam list. It will not trash the Jam for any other collaborator on the file.

Hangouts classic (chat messaging feature only)

It is recommended that users start a new conversation when adding multiple members to a chat conversation. Additionally, users should refrain from using PHI in group chat naming. New members that are added to group chats will be able to see previous chat history.

Admins can control whether their users can chat with others outside of their organization, display users’ chat status outside of their organization, or warn users when they are chatting with others outside of their organization.

Additionally users can control whether others inside or outside of their organization can see when they were last seen online, which device they are on, and when they are in a video or phone call on their devices.

Admins should configure these settings consistent with the organization’s policies.

Note that Google Talk does not support HIPAA compliance. Admins with “Google Talk only” enabled under the Google Hangouts service bit should consider turning off the service or ensure users that handle PHI do not use Google Talk.

Google Chat

Chat provides several options for Admins to control sharing PHI. Chat can be enabled or disabled for everyone in the domain or selectively enabled for specific organizations.

To enable the service for specific organizations, Admins can select the ‘ON for some organizations’ option which displays the Org Units to search and select.

Note that Chat now supports cross domain and external communication, refer to this article and blog post for details.

It is recommended that users create a new room when adding multiple members to a chat conversation. Additionally, users should refrain from using PHI in room naming. New members that are added to rooms will be able to see previous chat history. Invitees can preview the room and read messages.

Sharing options

Users can choose how visible files and folders are, as well as the editing and sharing capabilities of collaborators, when sharing files in Google Drive (including Docs, Sheets, Slides, and Forms). When creating and sharing files in Google Drive (including Docs, Sheets, Slides, and Forms) it is recommended that users avoid putting PHI in titles of such files, folders, or Team Drives.

Admins can set file sharing permissions to the appropriate visibility level for the Google Workspace account. Admins can “Restrict” or “Allow” employees to share documents outside the domain, and set the default file visibility to “Private.”

When sharing Google Drive files (including Docs, Sheets, Slides, and Forms) to a room, all members of the room are granted “Comment Access” to the file. This will not overwrite sharing permissions set up by an Admin. New members of the room will be granted “Comment Access” to all files that have previously been shared in the room.

If a member has been removed from the room, they will lose “Comment Access” to all files that have been shared in the room unless they continue to have access through other means such as membership of other rooms where the document is shared, or shared directly with the member.

Bots and integrations

Bots and integrations are controlled using the “Bot options” settings. Google offers two bots that integrate with other Google Workspace services: @meet and @drive. Third party developers can also create bots for use with Chat. Admins should carefully consider disabling bots and integrations, by unchecking the following item under Bots:

@Meet by Google

@Meet is a meeting scheduling bot that can be used within Chat. This bot has been designed to follow the Calendar sharing settings set by the domain and end user. Please refer to "Use the @Meet bot" for additional guidelines on the usage of @Meet.

@Drive by Google

@Drive is a file management bot that can be used within Chat. It will notify users when new files are shared with them, when new comments are made on files, or when someone else requests access This bot has been designed to interoperate with Drive sharing settings set by the domain and end user. "Use the Google Drive bot" for additional guidelines on the usage of @Drive.

Third party bots and integrations

Admins should review the security of these applications, as well as any corresponding security and privacy documentation provided by the third party developer.

Google Chat compatibility

Google Chat defaults to coexist with the current version of Hangouts classic chat if both products are enabled for an organizational unit. With compatibility, direct messages from Chat are posted in Hangouts classic and vice versa. Chats in Hangouts classic with people outside of the organizational unit will not be forwarded to Chat.

Google Meet (Google's video meeting experience)

Google Meet, the video meeting experience by Google, supports HIPAA compliance.

Meet allows you to control whether external guests may participate in each video meeting. People in the same Google Workspace domain can manage external guest access by controlling who gets invited to the meeting, determining whether to permit anonymous guests to join a running video call, and removing unwanted participants from the call. Please see the Meet support pages for more information on inviting guests, and the “Meet dialing to GV users” section below for more details on the information that is displayed when dialing out to a Google Voice user.

Meet uses randomized meeting identifiers and dial-in details. It is not possible to customize external access identifiers to video meetings so there is no need to randomize any addressing information.

Meet meetings allow for users to share text-based chat messages with other participants. Messages are only available during the call, unless the call is recorded.

Meet allows Google Workspace Enterprise users to record meetings which are then saved to the Drive of the meeting owner. The recording is saved in MP4 format and is a regular file in Drive with all Drive controls available, including Vault policies. The recording is automatically shared with guests invited to the Calendar event. Chat messages sent during a recorded call are preserved as a .txt file alongside the recording.

Admins are able to control whether users can record their meetings from the Admin console.

Meet dialing to GV users

Google Voice users will see Meet meeting names displayed on their devices when a Meet meeting participant dials out to the Google Voice user from within a Meet meeting. The meeting name will only be displayed if the Google Voice user is on the meeting invite, is in the same domain as the meeting creator and the calendar invite is visible to users in the domain, or if the meeting creator’s calendar is publicly shared.

To limit exposure to PHI when a Google Voice user is dialed into a Meet meeting, users should consider setting calendar entries to “Private” for calendar entries that contain PHI. Admins should consider setting external Calendar settings to “Only free/busy information” and internal Calendar sharing options to “No sharing” or “Only free/busy information.”

Admins can control the use of search history with Google Cloud Search via the Web History service in the Admin console. Admins can turn the Web History service on or off for everyone, or for select organizational units. Users with Web History turned on will have their personal search history stored, and will benefit from better search results and suggestions. Search history is stored until deleted by a user at history.google.com.

When using connectors to share third party data with Google Cloud Search Platform edition, customers are responsible for ensuring access controls and permission settings are accurately configured based on the organization’s data use policies.

When building connectors to index their third party data, customers should apply the individual document access and permission settings through the connector so it can be interpreted accordingly by Cloud Search when indexing and servicing content to users. PHI in document titles and descriptions may be exposed to individuals as search results if a connector application does not properly translate the access and permission settings in a third party data store. Find more guidance on Cloud Search Connectors and access and permission settings.

Learn more about Cloud Search.

Cloud Identity Management

Cloud Identity Management is an Identity-as-a-Service (IDaaS) solution that provides a centralized console to manage users, apps and devices. If you need to store PHI information, custom user attributes is the only place you can store user’s PHI information.

When you create a user account, Cloud Identity Management provides predefined user profile attributes such as employee ID, location and title.You can create custom attributes, if you would like to store any other information about the user that is not part of predefined attributes. With custom attributes, you can:

  • Add more user data you want to record; for example, assign different data types to special value fields, such as number, date, and email.

  • Control whether you want the information to be public to all users in your organization, or private to administrators and the individual user.

For additional information on how to create and manage custom attributes, please review this help center article.

If you decide to store PHI information in the custom attributes, we strongly recommend you to make the custom attribute as ‘Private”. This will make the custom attribute visible only to the individual user and the delegated or super administrators who have ‘read’ or ‘edit’ privileges to the user profiles. If you do not set the ‘Private’ flag, then the custom attribute will be accessible to all users in the domain. Detailed instructions are available in the “add a new custom attribute” section in this help center article. In addition to using admin console, you can use the following ways to create custom attributes.

  • Admin SDK: please review this help center article for additional information on creating, managing, or setting up security for customer attributes. Pay close attention to readAccessType while creating a customSchema and please note the ‘Private’ flag is known as “ADMINS_AND_SELF” in the API.

  • Google Cloud Directory sync (GCDS): please review this help center article for additional information on creating, managing, or setting up security for custom attributes. Pay close attention to Read Access Type setting.

Groups

Admins should review the sharing options in the Groups admin console settings in order to appropriately restrict outside domain access, default discoverability, and default view topics permission of newly created groups.

For groups containing PHI, admins should consider setting access to groups to “Private”, which will restrict all Groups created on the domain from visibility outside the domain. Admins or group owners may also set the default “View topics” permission to at most “All members of the group” to restrict access to the web posts and email archive of the group.

Individual group owners can access additional permissions located under the “Manage > Permissions” section of the group’s settings. These elections further control access to who can join and view, post, edit, and delete posts within a specific group.

Groups posts are stored until deleted by a user. The email archive of a group can be deleted via “Manage > Information > Advanced” section. Note that deleting a group is permanent and deletes everything related to the group including memberships.

If creating groups to manage mailing lists, careful consideration should be made when naming and emailing the group so it does not expose the PHI of the members of the group. Using the “to:” field instead of the “bcc:” field when emailing groups (i.e. mailing lists) will expose any individual that “Reply all” to the email as other recipients on the email thread will be able to see the individual's response.

If groups is used as a collaborative inbox, note that all collaborators will be able to see emails sent to the collaborative inbox and access should be restricted accordingly. Any PHI that is sent to or from the collaborative inbox will be visible to all collaborators and may expose an individual's PHI. Careful consideration should be made when naming the collaborative inbox so PHI would not be exposed when individuals receive emails from such inboxes.

Google Voice (managed users only)

Licensed users of Google Voice are covered under the Google Workspace BAA. Administrators should obtain Google Voice licenses for users that handle PHI. Please refer to Assign Google Voice licenses and Migrate existing users to managed accounts.

For additional HIPAA considerations on dialing Google Voice users via Meet, see the Meet dialing to GV users section.

Tasks

Administrators may turn the Tasks service on/off in Admin console. Information stored in Tasks is always private for the individual and should not be visible to other users or outside the organization.

Additional considerations for HIPAA compliance

Separating user access within your domain

To manage end user access to different sets of Google services, a Google Workspace administrator can create organizational units to put end users who manage PHI and end users who do not into separate groups. Once these units are set up, the administrator can turn specific services on or off for groups of users.

In a small Google Workspace account, for instance, there are typically two or three organizational units. The largest unit includes employees with most services enabled, including YouTube and Currents; another unit is for employees who may manage PHI, with certain services disabled. In a more complex Google Workspace account, there are more organizational units that are often divided by department. Human resources may manage PHI, but those who do may be only a subset of HR employees. In that case, administrators could configure an HR organizational unit with most services enabled for some users, and another HR organizational unit for employees using the HIPAA Included Functionality with PHI (with certain services disabled and settings configured appropriately).

To learn more, please refer to our Support resources that discuss how to set up organizational units and how to turn services on and off.

Use of third party applications, systems, or databases

If an end user wants to use the HIPAA Included Functionality to share PHI with a third party (or a third party application, add-on, system, or database), including through authorizing API access to PHI, some of the services may make it technically possible to do so. However, it is the customer’s responsibility to ensure that appropriate HIPAA-compliant measures are in place with any third party (or third party application, add-on, system or database) before sharing or transmitting PHI. Customers are solely responsible for determining if they require a BAA or any other data protection terms in place with a third party before sharing PHI with the third party using Google Workspace services or applications that integrate with them.

To learn more, please refer to our Support resources that discuss how to control user installation of Marketplace apps.

Security best practices

To keep your data safe and secure, we recommend all organizations with Enterprise or Cloud Identity licenses review the security health tool, which provides recommendations on how to improve your security posture. All organizations can see these security recommendations for medium and large businesses (100+ users) in the Cloud Identity Help Center or Google Workspace Admin Help.

Security audits and certifications

A list of security and privacy controls available with Google Workspace can be found on our Google Workspace Admin help center.

In addition to supporting HIPAA compliance, the Google Workspace Core Services are audited using industry standards such as ISO/IEC 27001, ISO/IEC 27017, ISO/IEC 27018, and SOC 1/2/3 Type II audits, which are the most widely recognized, internationally accepted independent security compliance audits. To make it easier for everyone to verify our security and compliance controls, we’ve made our ISO/IEC certificates and SOC audit reports available for download via Compliance Reports Manager.

Additional resources

These additional resources may help you understand how Google services are designed with privacy, confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data in mind.

This HIPAA implementation guide is for informational purposes only. Google does not intend the information or recommendations in this guide to constitute legal advice. Each customer should independently evaluate its own particular use of the services as appropriate to support its legal compliance obligations.

Disclaimer

The information contained herein is intended to outline general product direction and should not be relied upon in making purchasing decisions nor shall it be used to trade in the securities of Alphabet Inc. The information presented is not a commitment, promise, or legal obligation to deliver any material, code or functionality. Any references to the development, release, and timing of any features or functionality described for these services remains at Google’s sole discretion. Product capabilities, time frames and features are subject to change and should not be viewed as Google commitments.