Getting started with Go on Compute Engine

This tutorial shows how to get started with Compute Engine. Follow this tutorial by deploying a Hello World Go web app to Compute Engine. For help getting started with App Engine, see the App Engine standard environment.

Objectives

  • Use Cloud Shell to download and deploy a Hello World sample app.
  • Use Cloud Build to build a Hello World sample app.
  • Deploy a Hello World sample app to a single Compute Engine instance.

Costs

This tutorial uses the following billable components of Google Cloud:

To generate a cost estimate based on your projected usage, use the pricing calculator. New Google Cloud users might be eligible for a free trial.

Before you begin

  1. Sign in to your Google Account.

    If you don't already have one, sign up for a new account.

  2. In the Cloud Console, on the project selector page, select or create a Google Cloud project.

    Go to the project selector page

  3. Make sure that billing is enabled for your Google Cloud project. Learn how to confirm billing is enabled for your project.

  4. Enable the Compute Engine and Cloud Build APIs.

    Enable the APIs

  5. In the Google Cloud Console, open the app in Cloud Shell.

    Go to Cloud Shell

    Cloud Shell provides command-line access to your cloud resources directly from the browser. Open Cloud Shell in your browser and click Proceed to download the sample code and change into the app directory.

  6. In Cloud Shell, configure the gcloud tool to use your new Google Cloud project:
    # Configure gcloud for your project
    gcloud config set project YOUR_PROJECT_ID
    

Running the app in Cloud Shell

  1. In Cloud Shell, start a local web server:

    go build -o app
    ./app
    
  2. In Cloud Shell, click Web preview , and select Preview on port 8080. This opens a new window with your running app.

    In your web browser, you see Hello, World!.

  3. When you're ready to move on, stop the local web server by pressing Control+C in Cloud Shell.

Deploying to a single instance

This section walks you through running a single instance of your app on Compute Engine.

Single-instance deployment.

From Cloud Shell, you can deploy to a single Compute Engine instance virtual machine (VM) which runs your app.

Use Cloud Build to build the app

Cloud Build is used to build the app, compress it in a tar file, and upload the file to a Cloud Storage bucket. Buckets are the basic containers that hold your data in Cloud Storage.

  1. In your terminal window, create a Cloud Storage bucket, where YOUR_BUCKET_NAME represents the name of your bucket:

    gsutil mb gs://YOUR_BUCKET_NAME
    

    You can choose any name for your Cloud Storage bucket. It's a good practice to give your bucket the same name as your project ID. Bucket names must be unique across all of Google Cloud, so it's possible that you can't use your project ID as the bucket name.

  2. Start the Cloud Build process:

    gcloud builds submit --substitutions=_DEPLOY_DIR=gs://YOUR_BUCKET_NAME,_DEPLOY_FILENAME=app.tar.gz
    

    The gcloud builds submit command uses --substitutions to configure the location that the resulting tar file is uploaded to. Later, the tar file is downloaded to the Compute Engine instance.

    Cloud Build uses a YAML configuration file to define the steps the build requires.

    steps:
      # Print the Go version being used.
      - name: 'mirror.gcr.io/library/golang'
        args: ['go', 'version']
      # Make a deploy directory we'll tar after building the app.
      - name: 'debian'
        args: ['mkdir', '-p', 'deploy/etc/systemd/system/', 'deploy/usr/bin']
      # Build the app.
      - name: 'mirror.gcr.io/library/golang'
        env: [
          'GO111MODULE=on',
          'GOPROXY=https://proxy.golang.org,direct',
          'GOOS=linux',
          'GOARCH=amd64'
        ]
        args: ['go', 'build', '-o', 'deploy/usr/bin/app', '.']
      # Copy the systemd service file into the deploy directory.
      - name: 'debian'
        args: ['cp', 'my-app.service', 'deploy/etc/systemd/system/']
      # Compress the depoy directory.
      - name: 'debian'
        args: ['tar', '-czf', '${_DEPLOY_FILENAME}', '-C', './deploy', '.']
    # Upload the tarball to Cloud Storage.
    artifacts:
      objects:
        location: '${_DEPLOY_DIR}'
        paths: ['${_DEPLOY_FILENAME}']

Use a startup script to initialize an instance

You need a way to instruct your instance to download and run your code. An instance can have a startup script that runs whenever the instance is started or restarted.

A startup script runs when an instance first boots.

set -ex

# Install logging monitor. The monitor will automatically pickup logs sent to syslog.
curl -s "https://storage.googleapis.com/signals-agents/logging/google-fluentd-install.sh" | bash
service google-fluentd restart &

APP_LOCATION=$(curl -s "http://metadata.google.internal/computeMetadata/v1/instance/attributes/app-location" -H "Metadata-Flavor: Google")
gsutil cp $APP_LOCATION app.tar.gz
tar -xzf app.tar.gz

# Start the service included in app.tar.gz.
service my-app start

The startup script performs these tasks:

  • Installs the Stackdriver Logging agent and configures it to monitor the app logs.

  • Downloads and extracts the deployment tar file.

  • Starts a systemd service to run the app.

Create and configure a Compute Engine instance

  1. Create a Compute Engine instance:

    Linux/macOS

    gcloud compute instances create my-app-instance \
    --image-family=debian-10 \
    --image-project=debian-cloud \
    --machine-type=g1-small \
    --scopes userinfo-email,cloud-platform \
    --metadata-from-file startup-script=startup-script.sh \
    --metadata app-location="gs://YOUR_BUCKET_NAME/app.tar.gz" \
    --zone YOUR_ZONE \
    --tags http-server
    

    Replace YOUR_ZONE with a development zone, for example us-central1-a. For more information on regions and zones, see Geography and regions.

    The --metadata app-location flag tells the startup script where to download the app tar file.

    Windows

    gcloud compute instances create my-app-instance ^
    --image-family=debian-10 ^
    --image-project=debian-cloud ^
    --machine-type=g1-small ^
    --scopes userinfo-email,cloud-platform ^
    --metadata-from-file startup-script=startup-script.sh ^
    --metadata app-location="gs://YOUR_BUCKET_NAME/app.tar.gz" ^
    --zone YOUR_ZONE ^
    --tags http-server
    

    Replace YOUR_ZONE with a development zone, for example us-central1-a. For more information on regions and zones, see Geography and regions.

    The --metadata app-location flag tells the startup script where to download the app tar file.

    This creates a new instance, allows it to access Google Cloud services, and runs your startup script. The instance name is my-app-instance.

  2. Check the progress of the instance creation:

    gcloud compute instances get-serial-port-output my-app-instance --zone YOUR_ZONE
    

    When the startup script is complete, you see the following message:

    startup-script: INFO Finished running startup scripts.
    
  3. Create a firewall rule to allow traffic to your instance:

    gcloud compute firewall-rules create default-allow-http-80 \
        --allow tcp:80 \
        --source-ranges 0.0.0.0/0 \
        --target-tags http-server \
        --description "Allow port 80 access to http-server"
    

  4. Get the external IP address of your instance:

    gcloud compute instances list
    
  5. To see your app running, enter this URL in your browser:

    http://YOUR_INSTANCE_IP
    

    Replace YOUR_INSTANCE_IP with the external IP address of your instance.

Manage and monitor an instance

You can use the Cloud Console to monitor and manage your instance.

  1. In the Cloud Console, go to the VM instances page.

    Go to the VM instances page

  2. In the list of virtual machine instances, click SSH in the row of the instance that you want to connect to.
  3. To view all of the logs generated by your Compute Engine resources, go to the Logs viewer page. Go to Logs viewer

    Stackdriver Logging is automatically configured to gather logs from various common services, including syslog.

Cleaning up

To avoid incurring charges to your Google Cloud Platform account for the resources used in this tutorial:

Delete the project

  1. In the Cloud Console, go to the Manage resources page.

    Go to the Manage resources page

  2. In the project list, select the project you want to delete and click Delete .
  3. In the dialog, type the project ID, and then click Shut down to delete the project.

Delete the individual resources

gcloud compute instances delete my-app-instance --zone=YOUR_ZONE --delete-disks=all
gcloud compute firewall-rules delete default-allow-http-80

What's next

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