Setting Advanced API Options

This page describes how to set up advanced configuration options, like input mappings and virtual properties, for type providers. To learn more about types, read the Types Overview. To learn more about type providers, read the One-page Guide to Integrating with Deployment Manager.

If you are trying to integrate an API that does not satisfy the API requirements defined by Deployment Manager, you can use input mappings and virtual properties to help resolve these inconsistencies. Input mappings let you provide explicit mappings of API parameters where there is ambiguity and virtual properties let you expose arbitrary properties that don't exist in the underlying APIs so you can simplify input and hide complexities of the API from your users.

Implementing advanced configuration options requires intimate familiarity with the API for which you are creating the type provider. Since each API can vary widely from others, this page provides general guidance and examples but does not provide specific API guidance.

Before you begin

Common scenarios that require advanced configuration options

Property name is reused with different values

In certain APIs, the same property or parameter name might be reused in different methods but with different values. For example, an API might specify that the name parameter for creating a resource (a POST request), might have the value foo/bar, while the same name field for an update requests (PATCH or PUT) might require the value foo/bar/baz.

Property values can be inferred from the API response

Certain API methods require a server-generated value that is returned when you make a GET request to the resource. For example, an API might require an etag parameter to make update requests when mutating a resource. The etag value changes after each mutate request, so you get the current etag parameter by performing a GET request to the resource, before making the request to update the resource.

Using input mappings, you can tell Deployment Manager that the etag field can be retrieved from the API resource. Deployment Manager automatically performs a GET request to get this value when a user calls the method you specified in the input mappings.

Simplify user input

Deployment Manager supports virtual properties which are arbitrary properties that you can expose to your users through Deployment Manager for different uses. Treat virtual properties as properties do not exist on the underlying API but are arbitrary variables whose value you can inject as necessary in your input mappings. For example, imagine that there is an API property that must be base64 encoded before the value is sent to the underlying API. Rather than asking your users to provide the value in base64 encoding, you could create a virtual property that prompts users for the plain text value, then base64 encode the value with input mappings, and finally, supply the result to the underlying API.

Specifying advanced options

To specify advanced options, provide the collectionOverrides property when creating your Type Provider resource, and define input mappings or virtual properties for each API collection as you need.

For example, using the gcloud tool, you can provide advanced options using a YAML file and supply the YAML file with your type-providers create request. A sample YAML file might look like this:

collectionOverrides:
- collection: /emailAddresses/v1beta/people
  options:
    inputMappings:
    - methodMatch: ^create$
      fieldName: emailAddress.displayName
      value: $.resource.properties.displayName
      location: BODY
    - methodMatch: ^update$
      fieldName: displayName
      value: $.resource.properties.displayName
      location: PATH
    virtualProperties: |
      schema: http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema#
      type: object
        properties:
        - displayName:
            type: string
credential:
  basicAuth:
    user: [USERNAME]
    password: [PASSWORD]

This configurations tells Deployment Manager:

  • For the create method, look for the field named emailAddress.displayName in the resource body and set that field's value to the user's input for the displayName property in the Deployment Manager configuration. So if a user sets their config like this:

     resources:
     - name: example
       type: myproject/emailAddress:/emailAddresses/v1beta/people
       properties:
       - displayName: John Doe
         ...
    

    Deployment Manager will set the value for emailAddress.displayName to John Doe.

  • For the update method, the field is in the resource path instead of the resource body but the same input mapping is applied.

Specifying input mappings

An input mapping allows you map or inject information for certain API fields so that Deployment Manager can more seamlessly interact with the underlying API, relieving the burden on your users to understand subtle API behavior.

Use input mappings to simplify how your users interact with the API. For example, you can use input mappings to automatically get server-generated values, such as fingerprints, IDs, or etags. This saves users the trouble of performing a separate get request on the resource every time they want to make an update.

Similarly, you can also use input mappings to handle ambiguous or confusing situations where the same API field has different values for different methods. For example, a request to create a resource might require a name property that the user can specify, but the same API might require a name property in a different format for update methods. You can use input mappings to tell Deployment Manager which value is appropriate for each API method.

To specify input mappings for a type provider, provide the options.inputMappings property. You can define input mappings that apply for the entire API or you can explicitly provide input mappings for each collection:

# Input mappings for the entire API
"options": {
  "inputMappings": [
      {
          "fieldName": "[NAME]",
          "location":  "[PATH | BODY | QUERY | HEADER]",
          "methodMatch": "[REGEX_MATCHING_CERTAIN_METHODS]",
          "value": "[VALUE_TO_INJECT]"
      },
      {
          "fieldName": "[NAME]",
          "location":  "[PATH | BODY | QUERY | HEADER]",
          "methodMatch": "[REGEX_MATCHING_CERTAIN_METHODS]",
          "value": "[VALUE_TO_INJECT]"
      }
   ]
},
# Input mappings for specific collections
"collection": "[SPECIFIC_COLLECTION]",
  "options": {
   "inputMappings": [
    {
     "fieldName": "[NAME]",
     "location": "[PATH | BODY | QUERY | HEADER]",
     "methodMatch": "[REGEX_MATCHING_CERTAIN_METHODS]",
     "value": "[VALUE_TO_INJECT]"
    },
    {
     "fieldName": "[NAME]",
     "location": "[PATH | BODY]",
     "methodMatch": "[REGEX_MATCHING_CERTAIN_METHODS]",
     "value": "[VALUE_TO_INJECT]"
    },
     ...[additional fields if necessary]...
   ]
  }

Each of the important parts of this syntax is described below.

Collection

[SPECIFIC_COLLECTION] is the API collection for which this input mapping applies. For example, if you were providing input mappings for a Google Discovery document, like the IAM Service Accounts API, relevant collections are projects.serviceAccounts and projects.serviceAccountKeys.

For an API that uses OpenAPI specification, the collection path might be /example-collection/{name}. You can explore a functional OpenAPI example on the OpenAPI GitHub repository.

Field name

"fieldName" is the API attribute or property for which you want to specify the input mapping. For example, "fieldName": "fingerprint", "fieldName": "etag" and so on.

Location

API properties can appear either as parameters in the URL path, or as part of the request or response body. Specify where this input mapping applies, such as the URL PATH or request BODY as the location. Supported values include:

  • PATH
  • BODY
  • QUERY
  • HEADER

Method match

Specify what methods this input mapping applies to. Use regex to specify multiple methods. For example:

"methodMatch":"^create$"

For OpenAPI specifications, you can do:

"methodMatch: ^(put|get|delete|post)$"

Value

Specify the value that Deployment Manager should inject for this field. This field uses JSONPath notation. For example, this input mapping says that for the name field, Deployment Manager should take the user-supplied value and inject it into the format projects/$.project/topics/$resource.properties.topic:

"inputMappings":[
{
  "fieldName":"name",
  "location":"PATH",
  "methodMatch":"^post$",
  "value":"concat(\"projects/\", $.project, \"/topics/\", $.resource.properties.topic)"
}...
  • When you use $.resource.properties.[VARIABLE], you set value to a property that a user will be setting in their configuration. For example, for $.resource.properties.topic, the value will be the user-provided value for the property topic in their configuration:

    resources:
    - name: example
      type: example-type-provider:collectionA
      properties:
        topic: history # The value of "history" would be used for the `name` parameter because of the input mapping above
    
  • To reference the resource itself after a get request, use $.resource.self.[VARIABLE]. For example, for update requests, if you wanted to get the latest fingerprint, you can use this syntax to tell Deployment Manager to perform a get and grab the value:

    {
      'fieldName': 'fingerprint',
      'location': 'BODY',
      'methodMatch': '^(put)$',
      # self represents the resource by doing a GET on it.
      # This mappings gets latest fingerprint on the request.
      # Final PUT Body will be
      # {
      #   "name": "my-resource-name",
      #   "fingerprint": "<server generated fingerprint>"
      # }
      'value': '$.resource.self.fingerprint'
    }
    

Using virtual properties

Virtual properties are arbitrary properties that you can expose to your users through Deployment Manager. These properties are not part of the underlying API but are arbitrary variables that can be used to pass information or hide inconsistencies of the API from your users. You can reference virtual properties in your input mappings as well.

Virtual properties follow the JSON 4 schema. Provide virtual properties as part of the options for a specific collection:

"collection": "[SPECIFIC_COLLECTION]",
  "options": {
   "virtualProperties": "schema: http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema#\ntype: object\nproperties:\n  [PROPERTY]:\n    type: [DATA_TYPE]\n  [ANOTHER_PROPERTY]:\n    type: [ANOTHER_DATA_TYPE]n"
   "inputMappings": [
    ...
   ]
  }

In a YAML definition file, this would look like:

- collection: projects.serviceAccounts
  options:
    virtualProperties: |
      schema: http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema#
      type: object
      properties:
        a-property:
          type : string
        b-property:
          type : string
      required:
      - a-property
      - b-property
    inputMappings:
    ...

For example, consider a fake API that generates email addresses. Let's assume the API has a method for creating an email that takes in a emailAddress.displayName property. When a user makes a request to create an email address, they provide a request like so:

POST https://example.com/emailAddresses/v1beta/people/

{
  "emailAddress": {
    "displayName": "john"
  }
}

Now, lets say the API exposes a way to update the email address but the method for updating an email just requires the displayName property, rather than the email.displayName property:

POST https://example.com/emailAddresses/v1beta/people/john

{
  "displayName": "josh"
}

How do you expect your users to provide this value when they use this type provider? You could ask them to specify the property differently depending on the operation:

# Creating an email
resources:
- name: example-config
  type: projects/test-project:emailAddresses
  properties:
    emailAddress:
      displayName: john


# Updating an email
resources:
- name: example-config
  type: projects/test-project:emailAddresses
  properties:
    displayName: john

Alternatively, you can create a virtual property that takes the same value, regardless of the operation, and then use input mappings to map the virtual property to the appropriate API parameter. For this example, assume you defined a virtual property named displayName. Your input mappings could then look like this:

{
    "collectionOverrides":[
      {
        "collection":"emailAddresses",
        "options":{
          "inputMappings":[
            {
              "fieldName":"emailAddress.displayName",
              "location":"BODY",
              "methodMatch":"^create$",
              "value":"$.resource.properties.displayName"
            },
            {
              "fieldName":"displayName",
              "location":"BODY",
              "methodMatch":"^update$",
              "value":"$.resource.properties.displayName"
            }
          ],
          "virtualProperties":"schema: http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema#\ntype: object\nproperties:\n  displayName:\n    type : string\nrequired:\n- displayName\n"
        }
      }
    ],
    "descriptorUrl":"https://example.com/emailAddresses/v1beta/",
    "options":{
      "nameProperty":""
    }
}

Specifically, the virtual property is defined here:

"virtualProperties":"schema: http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema#\ntype: object\nproperties:\n  displayName:\n    type : string\nrequired:\n- displayName\n"

In human-readable format:

"virtualProperties":
  "schema: http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema#\n
   type: object\n
   properties:\n
     displayName:\n
     - type : string\n"
   required:
   - displayName

Now, your users can specify displayName as the top level property for both update and create requests, and Deployment Manager will know how to map the value correctly.

# Creating an email
resources:
- name: example-config
  type: projects/test-project:emailAddresses
  properties:
    displayName: john


# Updating an email
resources:
- name: example-config
  type: projects/test-project:emailAddresses
  properties:
    displayName: john

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