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Diagnosing cluster issues

This page explains how to use the gkectl command-line interface (CLI) tool to diagnose issues in your GKE On-Prem clusters.

Overview

The gkectl tool has two commands for troubleshooting issues with clusters: gkectl diagnose cluster and gkectl diagnose snapshot. The commands work with both admin and user clusters.

gkectl diagnose cluster

Performs health checks on your GKE On-Prem cluster and reports errors. Runs health checks on the following components:

  • Cluster objects
  • Machine objects and the corresponding cluster nodes
  • Pods in the kube-system and gke-system namespaces
  • User control plane if the target cluster is a user cluster
  • vSphere persistent volumes in the cluster

gkectl diagnose snapshot

Compresses a cluster's status, configurations, and logs into a tarball file. Specifically, the default configuration of the command captures the following information about your cluster:

  • Kubernetes version
  • Status of Kubernetes resources in the kube-system and gke-system namespaces: cluster, machine, nodes, Services, Endpoints, ConfigMaps, ReplicaSets, CronJobs, Pods, and the owners of those Pods, including Deployments, DaemonSets, and StatefulSets
  • Status of the user control plane if the target cluster is a user cluster (the user cluster's control plane runs in the admin cluster)
  • Details about each node configuration including IP addresses, iptables rules, mount points, file system, network connections, and running processes
  • Logs from gkectl diagnose snapshot command.
  • Optionally, the GKE On-Prem configuration file used to install and upgrade clusters.

Credentials, including vSphere and F5 credentials, are removed before the tarball is created.

Diagnosing clusters

You can run gke diagnose cluster to look for common issues with your cluster.

Diagnosing an admin cluster

You can diagnose an admin cluster by passing in its name or by only passing in its kubeconfig.

Using admin cluster kubeconfig

Passing in the admin cluster's kubeconfig causes gkectl to automatically choose the admin cluster:

gkectl diagnose cluster --kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG]

Using admin cluster name

To get the admin cluster's name, run the following command:

kubectl get cluster --kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG]

Then, pass in the admin cluster name to gkectl diagnose cluster:

gkectl diagnose cluster --kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] \
--cluster-name=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_NAME]

If your admin cluster is functioning properly, gkectl diagnose cluster returns the following output:

Diagnosing admin cluster "[ADMIN_CLUSTER_NAME]"...
Checking cluster object...PASS
Checking machine objects...PASS
Checking kube-system pods...PASS
Checking storage...PASS
Cluster is healthy.

Diagnosing a user cluster

To diagnose a cluster, first get the user cluster's name:

kubectl get cluster --kubeconfig=[USER_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG]

Then, pass in the admin cluster's kubeconfig and the user cluster's name:

gkectl diagnose cluster --kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] \
  --cluster-name=[USER_CLUSTER_NAME]

If your user cluster is functioning properly, gkectl diagnose cluster returns the following output:

Diagnosing user cluster "[USER_CLUSTER_NAME]"...
Checking cluster object...PASS
Checking control plane pods...PASS
Checking machine objects...PASS
Checking other kube-system pods...PASS
Checking storage...PASS
Cluster is healthy.

Capturing cluster state

If gkectl diagnose cluster finds errors, you should capture the cluster's state and provide the information to Google. You can do so using the gkectl diagnose snapshot command.

gkectl diagnose snapshot has an optional flag, --seed-config. In addition to collecting information about the cluster, this flag collects the GKE On-Prem configuration file that was used to create or upgrade the cluster.

Capturing admin cluster state

To capture an admin cluster's state, run the following command, where --seed-config is optional:

gkectl diagnose snapshot --kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] [--seed-config]

The output includes a list of files and the name of a tarball file:

Taking snapshot of admin cluster "[ADMIN_CLUSTER_NAME]"...
   Using default snapshot configuration...
   Setting up "[ADMIN_CLUSTER_NAME]" ssh key file...DONE
   Taking snapshots...
       commands/kubectl_get_pods_-o_yaml_--kubeconfig_...env.default.kubeconfig_--namespace_kube-system
       commands/kubectl_get_deployments_-o_yaml_--kubeconfig_...env.default.kubeconfig_--namespace_kube-system
       commands/kubectl_get_daemonsets_-o_yaml_--kubeconfig_...env.default.kubeconfig_--namespace_kube-system
       ...
       nodes/[ADMIN_CLUSTER_NODE]/commands/journalctl_-u_kubelet
       nodes/[ADMIN_CLUSTER_NODE]/files/var/log/startup.log
       ...
   Snapshot succeeded. Output saved in [TARBALL_FILE_NAME].tar.gz.

To extract the tarball file to a directory, run the following command:

tar -zxf [TARBALL_FILE_NAME] --directory [EXTRACTION_DIRECTORY_NAME]

To look at the list of files produced by the snapshot, run the following commands:

cd [EXTRACTION_DIRECTORY_NAME]/[EXTRACTED_SNAPSHOT_DIRECTORY]
ls kubectlCommands
ls nodes/[NODE_NAME]/commands
ls nodes/[NODE_NAME]/files

To see the details of a particular operation, open one of the files.

Specifying the SSH key for the admin cluster

When you get a snapshot of the admin cluster, gkectl finds the private SSH key for the admin cluster automatically. You can also specify the key explicitly by using the --admin-ssh-key-path parameter.

Follow the instructions for Using SSH to connect to a cluster node to download the SSH keys.

Then in your gkectl diagnose snapshot command, set --admin-ssh-key-path to your decoded key file path:

gkectl diagnose snapshot --kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] \
--admin-ssh-key-path=[PATH_TO_DECODED_KEY]

Capturing user cluster state

To capture a user cluster's state, run the following command:

gkectl diagnose snapshot --kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] \
--cluster-name=[USER_CLUSTER_NAME]

The output includes a list of files and the name of a tarball file:

Taking snapshot of user cluster "[USER_CLUSTER_NAME]"...
Using default snapshot configuration...
Setting up "[USER_CLUSTER_NAME]" ssh key file...DONE
    commands/kubectl_get_pods_-o_yaml_--kubeconfig_...env.default.kubeconfig_--namespace_user
    commands/kubectl_get_deployments_-o_yaml_--kubeconfig_...env.default.kubeconfig_--namespace_user
    commands/kubectl_get_daemonsets_-o_yaml_--kubeconfig_...env.default.kubeconfig_--namespace_user
    ...
    commands/kubectl_get_pods_-o_yaml_--kubeconfig_.tmp.user-kubeconfig-851213064_--namespace_kube-system
    commands/kubectl_get_deployments_-o_yaml_--kubeconfig_.tmp.user-kubeconfig-851213064_--namespace_kube-system
    commands/kubectl_get_daemonsets_-o_yaml_--kubeconfig_.tmp.user-kubeconfig-851213064_--namespace_kube-system
    ...
    nodes/[USER_CLUSTER_NODE]/commands/journalctl_-u_kubelet
    nodes/[USER_CLUSTER_NODE]/files/var/log/startup.log
    ...
Snapshot succeeded. Output saved in [FILENAME].tar.gz.

Snapshot scenarios

The gkectl diagnose snapshot command supports four scenarios. To specify a scenario, us the --scenario flag. The following list shows the possible values:

  • system: (default) Collect a snapshot for the system namespaces: kube-system and gke-system.

  • system-with-logs: Collect a system snapshot with logs.

  • all: Collect a snapshot for all namespaces.

  • all-with-logs: Collect an all snapshot with logs.

You can use each of the four scenarios with an admin cluster or a user cluster, so there are eight possible permutations. The following examples show some of the possibilities.

To create a snapshot of the admin cluster using the system scenario:

gkectl diagnose snapshot \
--kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] \
--scenario=system

To create a snapshot of a user-cluster using the system-with-logs scenario:

gkectl diagnose snapshot \
--kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] \
--user-cluster=[USER_CLUSTER_NAME] \
--scenario=system-with-logs

To create a snapshot of a user cluster using the all scenario:

gkectl diagnose snapshot \
--kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] \
--cluster-name=[USER_CLUSTER_NAME] \
--scenario=all

To create a snapshot of the admin cluster using the all-with-logs scenario:

gkectl diagnose snapshot \
--kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] \
--scenario=all-with-logs

Performing a dry run for a snapshot

You can use the --dry-run flag to show the actions to be taken and the snapshot configuration.

To perform a dry run on your admin cluster, enter the following command:

gkectl diagnose snapshot --kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] \
--cluster-name=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_NAME] \
--dry-run

To perform a dry run on a user cluster, enter the following command:

gkectl diagnose snapshot --kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] \
--cluster-name=[USER_CLUSTER_NAME] \
--dry-run

Using a snapshot configuration

If the four scenarios don't meet your needs, you can create a customized snapshot by passing in a snapshot configuration file using the --snapshot-config flag:

gkectl diagnose snapshot --kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] \
--cluster-name=[USER_CLUSTER_NAME] \
--snapshot-config=[SNAPSHOT_CONFIG_FILE]

Generating a snapshot configuration

You can generate a snapshot configuration for a given scenario by passing in the --scenario and --dry-run flags. For example, to see the snapshot configuration for the default scenario (system) of a user cluster, enter the following command:

gkectl diagnose snapshot \
--kubeconfig=[ADMIN_CLUSTER_KUBECONFIG] \
--cluster-name=[USER_CLUSTER_NAME] \
--scenario=system
--dry-run

The output is similar to the following:

numOfParallelThreads: 10
excludeWords:
- password
kubectlCommands:
- commands:
  - kubectl get clusters -o wide
  - kubectl get machines -o wide
  - kubectl get clusters -o yaml
  - kubectl get machines -o yaml
  - kubectl describe clusters
  - kubectl describe machines
  namespaces:
  - default
- commands:
  - kubectl version
  - kubectl cluster-info
  - kubectl get nodes -o wide
  - kubectl get nodes -o yaml
  - kubectl describe nodes
  namespaces: []
- commands:
  - kubectl get pods -o wide
  - kubectl get deployments -o wide
  - kubectl get daemonsets -o wide
  - kubectl get statefulsets -o wide
  - kubectl get replicasets -o wide
  - kubectl get services -o wide
  - kubectl get jobs -o wide
  - kubectl get cronjobs -o wide
  - kubectl get endpoints -o wide
  - kubectl get configmaps -o wide
  - kubectl get pods -o yaml
  - kubectl get deployments -o yaml
  - kubectl get daemonsets -o yaml
  - kubectl get statefulsets -o yaml
  - kubectl get replicasets -o yaml
  - kubectl get services -o yaml
  - kubectl get jobs -o yaml
  - kubectl get cronjobs -o yaml
  - kubectl get endpoints -o yaml
  - kubectl get configmaps -o yaml
  - kubectl describe pods
  - kubectl describe deployments
  - kubectl describe daemonsets
  - kubectl describe statefulsets
  - kubectl describe replicasets
  - kubectl describe services
  - kubectl describe jobs
  - kubectl describe cronjobs
  - kubectl describe endpoints
  - kubectl describe configmaps
  namespaces:
  - kube-system
  - gke-system
  - gke-connect.*
prometheusRequests: []
nodeCommands:
- nodes: []
  commands:
  - uptime
  - df --all --inodes
  - ip addr
  - sudo iptables-save --counters
  - mount
  - ip route list table all
  - top -bn1
  - sudo docker ps -a
  - ps -edF
  - ps -eo pid,tid,ppid,class,rtprio,ni,pri,psr,pcpu,stat,wchan:14,comm,args,cgroup
  - sudo conntrack --count
nodeFiles:
- nodes: []
  files:
  - /proc/sys/fs/file-nr
  - /proc/sys/net/nf_conntrack_max
  • numOfParallelThreads: Number of parallel threads used to take snapshots.
  • excludeWords: List of words to be excluded from the snapshot (case insensitive). Lines containing these words are removed from snapshot results. "password" is always excluded, whether or not you specify it.
  • kubectlCommands: List of kubectl commands to run. The results are saved. The commands run against the corresponding namespaces. For kubectl logs commands, all Pods and containers in the corresponding namespaces are added automatically. Regular expressions are supported for specifying namespaces. If you do not specify a namespace, the default namespace is assumed.
  • nodeCommands: List of commands to run on the corresponding nodes. The results are saved. When nodes are not specified, all nodes in the target cluster are considered.
  • nodeFiles: List of files to be collected from the corresponding nodes. The files are saved. When nodes are not specified, all nodes in the target cluster are considered.
  • prometheusRequests: List of Prometheus requests. The results are saved.